Cuisines – Fuze Restaurant And Lounge http://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:53:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-90.png Cuisines – Fuze Restaurant And Lounge http://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/ 32 32 Creole Cuisine Restaurant Concepts returns to New Orleans mission with 1,000 meals https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/creole-cuisine-restaurant-concepts-returns-to-new-orleans-mission-with-1000-meals/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:21:36 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/creole-cuisine-restaurant-concepts-returns-to-new-orleans-mission-with-1000-meals/ NEW ORLEANS (press release) – Creole Cuisine Restaurant Concepts will serve 1,000 meals to those in need at the New Orleans Mission during the Thanksgiving holiday for the ninth consecutive year. “As a Christian and a resident of this community, it is a privilege to be able to help someone in need,” said Marv Ammari, […]]]>

NEW ORLEANS (press release) – Creole Cuisine Restaurant Concepts will serve 1,000 meals to those in need at the New Orleans Mission during the Thanksgiving holiday for the ninth consecutive year. “As a Christian and a resident of this community, it is a privilege to be able to help someone in need,” said Marv Ammari, General Manager of Creole Cuisine. “When someone has hit rock bottom, it can be difficult for them to ask for help, but the New Orleans mission gives them more than their dignity, it gives them hope for a better future. And our community is better for it.

“The Creole Cuisine team opens their hearts to our guests every year, and we see God’s handiwork in everything they do,” said David Bottner, executive director of the New Orleans Mission. “We are touched by the donations of food, services and much-needed support throughout the year, especially during the holidays. We are honored that they have chosen to partner with us over the past nine years.

The New Orleans Mission provides up to 700 hot meals a day, over 38,000 hot meals each month. Breakfast and lunch are served daily, dinner is served Monday through Friday. On weekends, additional meals are provided through food donations from churches and other partner organizations.

The New Orleans Mission is a Christian humanitarian organization dedicated to the rescue, recovery, re-engagement and reunification of people facing homelessness, drug addiction, human trafficking, abuse or mental illness. Motivated by faith in Jesus Christ, they walk alongside those in need as a demonstration of God’s unconditional love for all. The New Orleans Mission serves all, regardless of religion, race, ethnicity, or gender.

WHEN:
Tuesday, November 22
12:00 p.m.

WHERE:
New Orleans Mission
1134 Baroness Street
New Orleans, The

]]>
A new cafe in downtown Waterville, with a nod to European cuisine, adds to diverse dining options https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/a-new-cafe-in-downtown-waterville-with-a-nod-to-european-cuisine-adds-to-diverse-dining-options/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 21:59:10 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/a-new-cafe-in-downtown-waterville-with-a-nod-to-european-cuisine-adds-to-diverse-dining-options/ WATERVILLE — Tanya McCarthy rolled the homemade dough into a square, spread her poppyseed mixture on top, shaped it into a log and carefully scored the dough for slicing. She then placed the disc-shaped pastries on a parchment-lined baking sheet. “These need to rise again,” she said, “and they’ll bake for 20 minutes.” McCarthy, owner […]]]>

WATERVILLE — Tanya McCarthy rolled the homemade dough into a square, spread her poppyseed mixture on top, shaped it into a log and carefully scored the dough for slicing.

She then placed the disc-shaped pastries on a parchment-lined baking sheet.

“These need to rise again,” she said, “and they’ll bake for 20 minutes.”

McCarthy, owner of the Wild Clover Café & Market at 16 Silver St., was preparing his poppyseed schnecken in preparation for its grand opening on Friday.

It was one of many culinary delights she would create on Thursday for the opening of the cafe, which offers European pastries, sandwiches, pies, quiches and a range of loose leaf teas, coffee and cold drinks .

Locally sewn tea towels, jams, honey and German produce, including gooseberries for making meringue cake and tart cherries for Black Forest cake, are also available.

Tanya McCarthy, owner of the Wild Clover Café & Market, prepares poppy seed schnecken on Thursday. The cafe officially opens Friday at 16 Silver St. in downtown Waterville. Michael G. Seamans / Morning Watchman

McCarthy bakes a variety of croissants, including carrot cake, chocolate, banana bread and matcha, ground green tea croissant. Its sandwiches include a croque monsieur, constructed with ham, French cheese and bechamel sauce, and a goat cheese sandwich with pear relish and olive tapenade. Homemade granola bowls with fresh Greek yogurt, fruit, and local jam or honey are also offered, along with three types of quiches.

With the Waterville Opera House airing “The Sound of Music” over the weekend, McCarthy will also be offering Austrian cookies, sacher torte and a tea called “A Few of My Favorite Stuff.”

Kimberly Lindlof, president and CEO of the Mid-Maine Chamber of Commerce, said Thursday that Wild Clover is a unique and welcome addition to downtown Waterville.

“Downtown there are 22 restaurants between Jorgensen’s on the north end and Pete’s Pig on the south end,” she said. “Downtown Waterville is home to a culturally diverse selection of dining options that appeal to and perfectly complement the artsy offerings that are about to become much more robust right at the center of these restaurant selections.”

McCarthy moved effortlessly through her open kitchen on Thursday, which is clean and bright and gives patrons sitting in the cafe or in window nooks overlooking Silver Street a view of her culinary skills at work.

The Wild Clover Cafe & Market officially opens Friday on Silver Street in downtown Waterville. Michael G. Seamans / Morning Watchman

Growing up in Germany and traveling the world, McCarthy studied at the French Pastry School in Chicago and at Savor in Australia, where she lived for several years. McCarthy also worked for years in hotels and restaurants. She and her family lived in Maine for a while, moved to Australia and then came back here.

“We’re kind of at a point where the kids are pretty much out of college and it’s like, what’s the next step in life?” she said of her decision to open the cafe. “We don’t know where they will end up. This can be a good thing in Waterville. We can be more part of the community.

The revitalization of downtown Waterville prompted McCarthy to consider a site here. She had always liked the look of the building at 16 Silver St., the former location of a State Farm Insurance office. When it went on sale, she took a dive.

She began renovating the interior of the 1,200 square foot space in April, creating a kitchen, dining area and counter. She painted the walls soft pink, gray and green, and decorated with colorful silk flowers and small lights to mimic a style she had admired in English restaurants. Soft European music plays while she cooks.

A popular item for fall is Harvest Apple Pie, which has a base of Linzer cookies topped with pumpkin cake, pumpkin cheesecake mousse, and applesauce hidden inside. The pie is covered with a spiced glaze.

“I’m going to have a few more that I’ll make for the winter that will have gingerbread and chocolate,” McCarthy said. “I have espresso drinks. I love making Spanish lattes.

McCarthy also presents a braid of yeast poppy seeds; a bee sting cake with almonds, honey and vanilla custard; and a Cleopatra cake – a bundt cake made with grapes and Moscato wine.

McCarthy held a soft opening last weekend and said the response was positive.

“One woman was Italian and said, ‘It feels like home,'” McCarthy said. “It made me feel really good. It’s exactly what I wanted.

Wild Clover is open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.


Use the form below to reset your password. After you submit your account email, we’ll send you an email with a reset code.

” Previous

]]>
Texas Monthly has a cookbook as varied as the state’s cuisine https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/texas-monthly-has-a-cookbook-as-varied-as-the-states-cuisine/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 21:30:49 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/texas-monthly-has-a-cookbook-as-varied-as-the-states-cuisine/ The way we eat, and how it has changed over the years, has been a big part of Texas Monthly’s coverage of the Lone Star State for the past 50 years. The magazine’s latest project to document the wide array of Texas dishes is “The Big Texas Cookbook: The Food That Defines the Lone Star […]]]>

The way we eat, and how it has changed over the years, has been a big part of Texas Monthly’s coverage of the Lone Star State for the past 50 years. The magazine’s latest project to document the wide array of Texas dishes is “The Big Texas Cookbook: The Food That Defines the Lone Star State,” a collection of 100 new and old recipes, plus essays from past and present contributors to the magazine. .

Texas Monthly editor Courtney Bond and longtime food critic Pat Sharpe told Texas Standard that the cookbook pays homage to Texas culinary traditions, as well as new dishes created by those who emigrated. here. Listen to the interview above or read the transcript below.

This transcript has been slightly edited for clarity:

Texas Standard: “The Big Texas Cookbook” includes 100 recipes. I think it’s pretty hard to boil it all down to one to represent all the cuisines and traditions you have to cover here in Texas. Did you set any guidelines that helped you choose which cuisines or categories should be included?

Courtney Bond: I will say it was very tough, and I feel like we barely scratched the surface, as you can imagine. We knew we had to do the classics: Chicken Fried Steak, King Ranch Casserole, Chili, etc. We have whole chapters devoted to barbecue and tex-mex, of course, but we also wanted to include more modern versions of what we consider our staple dishes. We have a Lao Texas chili, and we have a Haitian soup, Joumou from Jonny Rhodes in Houston. We just wanted to give people what they want, which of course is these classic dishes, but also introduce them to new things that they might not have tried before.

When you talk about Texas cuisine, that largely includes the state’s climate – what grows and thrives here, right? Can you tell us about a few dishes that you consider particularly Texan? And what does it mean to be a Texas dish?

Pat Sharp: Well, I think the first one I want to mention is the pecan, because, of course, that’s our state nut. And we have pecan pie. We have pecan pralines. We have a Texas sheet cake with pecans on top. So I think we covered that one pretty well. And because pecans grow so widely throughout the state, I think many people will find these recipes appealing.

And then another one that comes to mind is doves, because dove season is really big this time of year, with a lot of hunters in Texas. And we have a great recipe for those jalapeño peppers that hunters love to make.

I’m so proud of myself that I resisted the temptation to make a dad joke about the status crackpot.

CC: This gives me the opportunity to recite one of my favorite lines from the cookbook, which is from our writer, Emily McCullar, who says it’s the only nut Texas grows commercially, other than our politicians.

Frito kolaches from “The Big Texas Cookbook”.
Jody Horton / Texas Monthly

Let’s go to the chilli. I was at a barbecue once with friends, and all the controversy erupted when one of them mentioned chili beans. And I know every native Texan it seems has an opinion on this, usually the beans in the chili is a big no-no. But this particular friend said that bean chili is a hot dog condiment. This sparked quite a debate around the campfire. So I’m curious, do any of you have any idea why this chili is such a lightning rod?

PS: I looked back, because I was curious about it to see if I could figure out where it all started. And somewhere online, I came across a comment that made a lot of sense to me, and it was from someone who’s been in a lot of chili contests. And he said the rule of the chili contest is that they don’t want anything to distract from the skill the contestant is showing in cooking the meat. So, in other words, they don’t want beans distracting you. They don’t want tomatoes watering it down or changing the flavor. And I think that’s maybe one of the reasons why it’s become such a flashpoint and people are so adamant about it. Courtney, do you have any ideas?

CC: I think at chili competitions they consider bean filling. They consider it a distraction, that they want the complexity of the beef, spices and dried chilies to stand on its own. But at the same time, we have a wonderful essay in the book by David Courtney, who writes like the Texan, who one day decided he was going to make chili with beans and he lived to tell the tale.

Surprises in this book, especially for readers who expect recipes for chicken fried steak, enchiladas, peach cobbler – all that sort of thing – but who may not realize how Texas cuisine is varied?

PS: Oh, there are so many recipes that are a surprise, but they also very often go well with things that are traditionally Texan. The one that really caught my eye was the Korean smoked beef ribs. And it’s a long recipe, so I won’t try to tell you everything. But what stands out is that there is a marinade for the prime rib that includes orange juice, red wine, and sesame oil. And that makes a big difference. And it’s like a recognizably meaty, hearty Texan recipe, but with a Korean twist.

I think most people immediately think of barbecue and Tex-Mex when they think of Texas in the kitchen. Courtney, could you elaborate on some important styles and recipes that new Texans have brought to the state? Korean cuisine is obviously one of them.

CC: This is precisely what interests me the most, is that each culture brings its traditions, and these are as varied as the people who come here. But it’s this intersection where these cultures meet traditional Texas techniques and foods like, put brisket in ramen. Valentina in Austin makes brisket empanadas. What can you put in a tortilla?

You know, José Ralat, our taco editor, just wrote in our November issue about a place in Bedford, near Fort Worth, called Dream Tacos, where you can get a tandoori chicken taco, sushi nachos, etc And the prime rib that Pat was talking about, it’s in our cookbook. There’s a recipe for a beef rib nigiri where they take it and form it over rice and it’s so, so exciting. The Lao chili we have in there, they take the garlic and they take the cumin, but then they add fish sauce and lemongrass. And it’s so interesting what people bring to the dishes we’ve cherished for a long time and sometimes make them even better.

I have to ask you about the beef nigiri. Is it cooked or raw beef?

CC: Ah, it’s cooked. Yeah.

PS: Don’t we also have some kind of steak tartare like – parisa?

BC: Yes, I think so.

Oysters from “The Big Texas Cookbook”.
Jody Horton / Texas Monthly

This book contains a number of essays as well as recipes, which I think shows how much what we love about food is tied to tradition and storytelling. That’s a big part of cooking in Texas, isn’t it?

CC: Absolutely. We have an older essay that we have included by Prudence Mackintosh where she writes about Helen Corbitt. And of course, I’ve always heard of Helen Corbitt’s Neiman Marcus affiliation – her invention of Texas caviar. But I hadn’t realized how much she had brought Texas cuisine into the modern era.

And then we have an essay from Daniel Vaughn, our barbecue editor, where he defends barbecue sauce, which is great fun. And then there’s a wonderful essay by Jose Galvan where he tries to recreate his Harlingen family fideo, but he lives in Oregon. And so he tells a wonderful story of trying to find the ingredients he deems necessary. And that’s just about the house, and the missing house. And it’s an evocative piece about how to recreate those dishes that mean so much to us.

The cool thing about cookbooks is that many of them are passed down from generation to generation. We have a cookbook from the 1950s that belonged to my grandmother; I’m sure a lot of kitchens have one. And I’m curious – what do you hope to do with this Texas cookbook? Is it more of a contemporary read about Texas and its food, or do you think it’s maybe one of those legacy books?

DB: We have to say both. There truly is a bedrock of recipes so traditional that you would expect when you say the words “Texas cookbook.” But there are so many surprises and there are so many good reads. I mean, I sat down with this after they brought the first copies to the office and just read the essays, and it’s so much fun. I think it’s going to be a big draw, and I think it’s going to be part of the legacy of the book.

]]>
Helmut Steiner Brings Authentic German/European Cuisine to Central Missouri https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/helmut-steiner-brings-authentic-german-european-cuisine-to-central-missouri/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 10:04:52 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/helmut-steiner-brings-authentic-german-european-cuisine-to-central-missouri/ Editor’s Note: This article is the second in a two-part series highlighting the experiences of Helmut Steiner. By the mid-1960s, Helmut Steiner, a German in his twenties, had gained a collection of life experiences working in locations across Europe. It was also then, through connections made along the way, that he was employed at a […]]]>

Editor’s Note: This article is the second in a two-part series highlighting the experiences of Helmut Steiner.

By the mid-1960s, Helmut Steiner, a German in his twenties, had gained a collection of life experiences working in locations across Europe. It was also then, through connections made along the way, that he was employed at a fancy hotel on Lake Windermere in England and was recently engaged to the daughter of a famous boat racer.

“Donald Campbell set world records in his speedboat and was a celebrity,” Steiner said. “His daughter had worked with me in Switzerland for a while, but because I was a poor guy from Germany and she came from a rich and famous family, we never got married.”

In 1967, his former fiancée’s father was killed while trying to set a new water speed record in England.

A common practice for Steiner and others working in hotels in Europe was to check classified advertisements in an international newspaper that advertised job openings in the hotel and restaurant industries. In this article, a restaurant in New Orleans announced that it was looking for qualified servers.

“I was 26 when I arrived in New Orleans and was hired by Brennan’s restaurant off Bourbon Street,” he said. “They took care of all the necessary paperwork for me to come to the United States.”

He continued, “It was great — I loved being in New Orleans. It was a wonderful city and I loved being by the ocean and fishing.”

After about a year in the city dubbed “the great facility” and “cradle of jazz,” Steiner was hired at the Tan-Tar-A Resort at the Lake of the Ozarks. They had a ski lodge for which they hired many Austrians and Germans, in addition to a restaurant, where they employed many Europeans.

“I was hired as a maitre d’ and it was a fine dining place at the time,” he said. “The United States is beautiful and I really fell in love with the lakes and all of their beauty. I stayed there for three or four years and then worked for a while at a hotel in Florida and at a resort in Hawaii too.

His wandering spirit began to settle somewhat after he was hired to work at the Lodge of Four Seasons at the Lake of the Ozarks. He then returned to Tan-Tar-A but then decided to become his own boss when he opened Das Stein Haus on the Strip near Bagnell Dam in the late 1970s.

The personal relationships and friendships he made over the years inspired another movement in his life after he met Art Firley. Founder of the Casualty Indemnity Exchange and well-known philanthropist, Firley helped Steiner establish Das Stein Haus in Jefferson City in 1981.

“Art was a good friend who believed in me and really invested in the place,” Steiner said. “We were serving authentic German cuisine and soon the restaurant and bar were running very well, so he gave me the opportunity to buy the business outright, which I did.”

Located in a building once used as a personal residence, Steiner added and created an outdoor entertaining space. The interior of the bar section pays homage to his German heritage and is decorated with framed artwork showcasing the jazz music he grew to love while living in New Orleans.

After her father died in Germany in 1987, Steiner made the decision to move her mother to the United States so he could help care for her during her advancing years. His older brother, Roman, also immigrated to the United States and settled with his family near Lake of the Ozarks in the 1970s.

Sadly, his mother, Herta Liebe Steiner, died in 2002 at the ripe old age of 95. Likewise, his brother, Roman, was also 95 when he died earlier this year.

The restaurant and bar at Das Stein Haus has become a cultural sensation in Mid-Missouri in Helmut Steiner’s more than 40 years at the helm.

“I think part of its success is that there are so many Germans and people of German descent living in this area,” Steiner said.

Das Stein Haus remains an attraction not only for those visiting the area, but it is also a regular stop for those from the surrounding communities. As chef and owner of the establishment, Steiner enjoys visiting customers and often toasts their visits with a tasty liqueur.

“This restaurant has become my life, and it has provided me with a living for all these years,” Steiner said.

Proud of his heritage, Steiner enjoys sharing pieces of his German homeland with the community through his restaurant. And having acquired his citizenship many years ago, he recognizes that the United States has provided him with many important opportunities and experiences.

“My life isn’t normal, but it’s certainly been interesting,” he said. “One thing I’ve learned is that you can go anywhere in the world and if you’re nice to people, so are they…it’s as simple as that.”

He continued, “I was lucky enough to meet a lot of good people who helped me along the way, but I also worked hard. You don’t have to earn a lot of money to be somebody.”

Smiling, he added, “It’s been a good life.”

Jeremy P. Ämick writes on behalf of the Silver Star Families of America.





]]>
Houston chef Chris Williams’ ‘Black Texas’ cookbook will be an authoritative look at black cuisine in the Lone Star State https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/houston-chef-chris-williams-black-texas-cookbook-will-be-an-authoritative-look-at-black-cuisine-in-the-lone-star-state/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 19:14:11 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/houston-chef-chris-williams-black-texas-cookbook-will-be-an-authoritative-look-at-black-cuisine-in-the-lone-star-state/ A James Beard Award-nominated Houston chef and acclaimed Houston writer team up to share the recipes, culinary contributions and eating habits of Black Texans. Chris Williams, the executive chef behind Lucille’s and owner of the nonprofit Lucille’s 1913, and food writer Kayla Stewart will co-write black texas, a cookbook that highlights recipes and stories of […]]]>

A James Beard Award-nominated Houston chef and acclaimed Houston writer team up to share the recipes, culinary contributions and eating habits of Black Texans.

Chris Williams, the executive chef behind Lucille’s and owner of the nonprofit Lucille’s 1913, and food writer Kayla Stewart will co-write black texas, a cookbook that highlights recipes and stories of the many contributions black people have made to Texas cuisine.

“What we expect of this book is that it be presented and received as an authoritative book on this part of American culinary history and that it creates a platform for other parts of our history. culinary,” says Williams. “I’ve seen so many cookbooks that are so beautiful, but are created by people who are authorities on black or African things, but have nothing to do with it.”

But it is not the case here. Williams and Stewart – who met years ago in an interview – both have Houston ties, with Williams hailing from Southside Houston, while Stewart is from Glenshire. The two met years ago during an interview for one of Stewart’s stories. Now they are gearing up to be co-writers.

“We speak the same language,” Williams says, adding that they’re both “grunts” with a tenacity to do shit. “We both appreciate coming from where we come from and loving the same industry, but working on different aspects of it.”

Williams says the initial groundwork for such a project began after opening Lucille’s and researching his grandmother’s home, where he perused a collection of family histories and recipes that told the story of his great-grandmother. grandmother Lucille B. Smith, who would become the namesake of her Museum Park restaurant. There he learned of his family’s influence on the local Texas cooking and barbecue scene, and later, while working in Kendleton with his non-profit organization, he became aware of his family’s roots in Kendleton, the small Fort Bend County town of 342, which dates back to Reconstruction. Both instances have helped provide a roadmap of connections to explore over the next two years, he says.

Stewart, who co-wrote the cookbook Gullah Geechee Home Cooking: Recipes from the Matriarch of Edisto Island and whose work has been published in various media, including Eater and the New York Times, said she first visited Lucille at college with her family. It wasn’t until after grad school in New York, when her food writing took her South, that she found herself profiling Willaims for the Southern Foodway Alliance. “Something clicked” in collaboration, she says.

With Williams seeking to transform her great-grandmother Lucille’s treasure chest of recipes into a modern work, and their shared interests in travel and expanding the definition of black food, “it was clear we were going working on something together, and we just hadn’t seen a story on Black Texas,” Stewart said.

Now the black texas The project is underway, with plans to compile a combination of recipes people can cook and stories that further illustrate the eating habits of the southern black community, Stewart says. (Lucille’s famous chili cookies, which are served at her eponymous restaurant, will be included.)

Williams says he and Stewart plan to plan more of their trip in December and will begin the bulk of their research in March 2023. Traveling and sitting with Texas residents will be essential parts of their work over the next few months.

“The only way to develop real empathy is to sit there breaking bread with them and breaking their bread, which contains their culture, and there’s so much history attached to it,” Williams says. “…I’m excited to get to know Texas better.”

black texas should publish in two years with Simon & Schuster.

“We hope to share Lucille’s many other recipe stories, what she was cooking at that time, what black food evolved into, and where we are today,” says Stewart. “We’re excited to provide insight into the state and its black food culture.”

]]>
A meaningful celebration of “Italian Food Week” https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/a-meaningful-celebration-of-italian-food-week/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 14:40:24 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/a-meaningful-celebration-of-italian-food-week/ Italian Ambassador Marco Clemente PHOTO BY J. GERARD SEGUIA Every year since 2015, embassies from around the world join in the celebration of Italian Food Week. In line with the objective of the global event – which is to promote the country’s culinary traditions and food and wine connoisseurs – the Italian Embassy in Manila […]]]>

Italian Ambassador Marco Clemente PHOTO BY J. GERARD SEGUIA

Every year since 2015, embassies from around the world join in the celebration of Italian Food Week. In line with the objective of the global event – which is to promote the country’s culinary traditions and food and wine connoisseurs – the Italian Embassy in Manila has prepared three significant and rooted events around the region Metro Manila.

“Each year, this week is dedicated to a theme, and this year the theme is ‘Friendliness, sustainability and innovation: the ingredients of Italian cuisine for the health of people and the protection of the planet.’ For this year’s celebration, we thought we’d dedicate a single, different culinary event to each of the three sub-events,” Ambassador Marco Clemente told the Manila Times in a recent interview.

For “sustainability”, the embassy is dedicating a gala dinner to be held in the oldest Italian restaurant in the capital, L’Opera BGC, on November 15. The invitation-only event will feature a special menu by Luciano de L’Opera Italiano Paolo Nesi that uses sustainably sourced ingredients.

Meanwhile, for “Innovation,” there will be a more casual aperitif (evening meal that serves an appetizer and tapas-style dishes) taking place at La Loggia, Palacio de Memoria on November 17.

Get the latest news


delivered to your inbox

Sign up for the Manila Times daily newsletters

By registering with an email address, I acknowledge that I have read and accept the terms of use and the privacy policy.

Chef Margarita Fores, an institution of Italian cuisine in Manila, and Italian chef Carla Brigliadori of the acclaimed Casa Artusi, have worked together to create a menu that showcases not only innovative Italian cuisines, but also the innovative wines of the country.

The evening will feature 14 courses accompanied by seven organic, biodynamic and natural Italian wines not easily accessible in the Philippines.

Finally, for “Conviviality,” the Embassy will have its biggest offering – a free-for-all rally taking place at the Servants of Charity Compound in Quezon City on November 19.

Clemente said the event is inspired by the Italian sagra or food fair which is less commercial and more social.

“We thought it was a great way to promote Italian cuisine, to have a day of celebration in a place run by Italian missionaries who are dedicated to helping people with physical and mental disabilities,” the ambassador explained. .

The venue was chosen as a way for the embassy to thank the missionaries for the great work they do, not only for the beneficiaries of the charity, but also for the community around them.

“We are proud to also bring joy to people who don’t have much and to do this with the help of Italian cuisine, I think, is an additional source of pride because it is one of our symbols of Italian national identity,” Clement noted.

“Everything we do has this double facet: to promote Italy but also to support the locals in different ways. Because something must also remain for the benefit of the locals, of the most deprived, of young people, of those who have not the possibility of enjoying cultural events”, finally noted the Ambassador.

Italian Food Week is one of the events held this year to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Italian-Philippine diplomatic relations.

Besides the upcoming culinary event, the Italian Embassy will also join the International Silent Film Festival later this month and will screen Puccini’s “Turandot” at the Cultural Center of the Philippines next month.

For more event details, visit https://ambmanila.esteri.it.

]]>
At the Masarap Cafe, West African and Filipino cuisines find their accord https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/at-the-masarap-cafe-west-african-and-filipino-cuisines-find-their-accord/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/at-the-masarap-cafe-west-african-and-filipino-cuisines-find-their-accord/ Start your day with LAist Sign up for How To LA, delivered weekday mornings. Felix Agyei and his wife Hazel Rojas are both working their regular Monday-Friday jobs – Agyei as a data analyst and Rojas in educational services. But on Saturdays, they head to a shared commercial kitchen space to prepare food for Masarap […]]]>

Felix Agyei and his wife Hazel Rojas are both working their regular Monday-Friday jobs – Agyei as a data analyst and Rojas in educational services. But on Saturdays, they head to a shared commercial kitchen space to prepare food for Masarap Cafe, their West African-Filipino food pop-up that comes to the Riviera Village Farmers Market in Redondo Beach every Sunday.

Passing by their stall on a recent Sunday morning, Agyei calls and asks me if I want to try the goat stew. “If you don’t like it, I’ll give you a dollar,” he offers.

The combination of West African and Filipino cuisine is certainly rare, and Agyei knows he has to entice passers-by to try it (as well as convince them that his food won’t be too spicy.)

His tactic seems to be working – he says virtually everyone who tastes the food ends up enjoying it, and many become repeat customers (including me).

Mix of backgrounds

Felix came to the United States from Ghana and met his wife, Hazel, who is Filipina, while they were both working at New Design Charter School in Watts. The two started dating six years ago and got married in 2020.

Mixing West African and Filipino foods in one meal has become common in their household.

“It’s something we used to do at home,” Agyei said.

Rojas regularly cooked pancit, a traditional Filipino noodle dish, while Agyei cooked jollof rice, a West African staple dish made with rice, tomatoes and onions. When they were entertaining friends, everyone seemed to like the combination and the idea of ​​starting a restaurant slowly planted itself in their minds.

Masarap means delicious

“The very idea of ​​the cafe came when we came downtown to eat at a Filipino restaurant,” Agyei recalls. He asked Rojas what the Filipino term for “delicious” was – and that’s how the name Masarap Cafe was born.

Masarap Cafe’s offerings include tortang talong, a Filipino egg omelet where whole grilled eggplant is dipped in egg batter, pan-fried and served with jollof rice.

(Brian Feinzimer for LAist)

They first started at the Farmers Market in January 2020, but were closed a few months later when the pandemic hit and all markets had to close temporarily. They finally restarted in the summer of 2021.

At Masarap Cafe, tortang talong – a Filipino egg omelet where grilled whole eggplants are dipped in egg batter and pan-fried – is served with jollof rice.

Ghanaian Filipino Secret Sauce

Even the seemingly traditional West African dishes featured on the menu still manage to contain elements of Filipino cuisine. Agyei and Rojas have come up with their own sauce which they call Masarap sauce, combining Ghanaian spices with spices traditionally used in Filipino cuisine. The exact spices used are a closely guarded secret, but they are blended with olive oil, garlic, onion, tomato and ginger.

Masarap sauce is found in the majority of their menu, including goat stew, baked chicken, and baked salmon dishes, all served with jollof rice and a salad tossed with grapes and thinly sliced ​​apples that serve of palate cleanser.

A black man serves rice from a polystyrene container while wearing a white shirt with yellow and orange leaves on it inside a tent.

At Masarap Cafe, jollof rice is always on the menu

(Brian Feinzimer for LAist)

Lately, Masarap Cafe has become popular enough that they still sell certain items every Sunday. Goat stew is one of their most sought after dishes. Pressure-cooked with the masarap sauce until tender, the goat meat is then cooked again in a savory tomato-based stew. Cafe Masarap opens at 9 a.m. on Sundays and goat stew can sell out around noon, followed closely by baked salmon.

Agyei and Rojas slowly added a few new items to the menu, including the masarap wrap – a wrap filled with jollof rice, corn, green beans and lima, carrots and chicken baked in their special masarap sauce – as well than a vegan version without the chicken. At around $6, the wrap makes for an easy and affordable meal that people can enjoy while shopping for produce at the market.

Permanent location

Rojas wants to add more menu items from his Filipino heritage, including pancit, but the couple don’t have the resources to do so yet.

A package containing red rice is laid on its side and is cut in half, with some of its contents spilling over the surface.

The jollof wrap is made with chicken or vegetables contains the perfect amount of flavor.

(Brian Feinzimer for LAist)

“At the moment, it’s a bit difficult to have employees to help us. It’s just the two of us and [we are] continues to work normally Monday to Friday,” Agyei said. “We go to the kitchen on Saturday to prepare the food, then we sell it on Sunday. It’s a little difficult to add more items to the menu, but customers have been asking for more Filipino food. »

With all the positive feedback they’ve received, Agyei and Rojas plan to find a permanent location so Agyei can transition to running the restaurant full-time, as well as getting their masarap sauce on grocery store shelves.

They are currently looking for a location in the Los Angeles area, but with skyrocketing prices, they are still on the hunt for the right space. In the meantime, you can find them at the Riviera Village Farmers Market on Sundays.

Do you have an idea for a culinary story?

Send it to us. We cannot answer all the questions we receive, but we will try to help you. We would love to hear from you.

]]>
Emirates responds to growing demand for plant-based cuisine https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/emirates-responds-to-growing-demand-for-plant-based-cuisine/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 14:18:39 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/emirates-responds-to-growing-demand-for-plant-based-cuisine/ New gourmet vegan dishes are now available for passengers traveling in first and business class, while economy class customers will also benefit from additional plant-based options. Meals can also be ordered in Emirates lounges. Emirates, which has already been named the best airline for vegans, aimed to develop a vegan menu comparable to best-in-class meals. […]]]>

New gourmet vegan dishes are now available for passengers traveling in first and business class, while economy class customers will also benefit from additional plant-based options. Meals can also be ordered in Emirates lounges.

Emirates, which has already been named the best airline for vegans, aimed to develop a vegan menu comparable to best-in-class meals. The carrier began offering vegan options since the 1990s, especially for travelers following a plant-based diet for religious reasons. However, the popularity of these menus has quickly reached more routes across the United States, Australia and Europe, while over the past 10 years demand has increased dramatically. How many? Enough to allow the airline to now offer more than 180 delicious plant-based recipes to satisfy the taste buds of its passengers.

First and Business Class menus have been developed at Emirates Flight Catering facilities at Dubai International Airport by vegan and non-vegan staff. The menu has been perfected with the help of specialist Chinese, Indian and Arab chefs. But First and Business Class passengers aren’t the only ones pampered, as the vegan menus in Economy Class also feature a wide variety of fresh produce that changes every month.
Vegan desserts are also popular on board, with multiple delicious offerings tempting the company’s customers.

As the benefits of plant-based foods become more and more evident, or simply because people want to eat lighter and healthier from time to time, Emirates uses alternative vegan products that contain only high-quality healthy ingredients. . These include: artisanal vegan cheese, chickpea flour, coconut cream, white quinoa seeds, jackfruit, kohlrabi, Beyond meat products, cherry tomato tofu, edamame, mushrooms, avocado, berries and a selection of invigorating Vitality juices. The menu is packed with essential nutrients and contains no sugar, artificial additives, fillers or preservatives.

Ingredients for the new menus onboard the Emirates fleet are sustainably sourced from prestigious UAE-based suppliers like Bustanica, the world’s largest hydroponic vertical farm developed after an investment of US$40 million. Bustanica uses innovative AI methods combined with the powerful know-how of human scientists to create fresh products without any chemicals.

World Vegan Day will be celebrated on Tuesday, November 1, 2022.

Source: eglobaltravelmedia.com.au

]]>
El Salsa de Cardigan will host a French cuisine pop-up event https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/el-salsa-de-cardigan-will-host-a-french-cuisine-pop-up-event/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 15:19:15 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/el-salsa-de-cardigan-will-host-a-french-cuisine-pop-up-event/ COLEG Ceredigion invites the public to El Salsa restaurant in Cardigan to support students who are hosting a Beaujolais pop-up party filled with French cuisine. The one-night event – ​​starting at 6pm on Friday November 11 – will see students cook and serve a traditional French menu of four to five courses accompanied by a […]]]>

COLEG Ceredigion invites the public to El Salsa restaurant in Cardigan to support students who are hosting a Beaujolais pop-up party filled with French cuisine.

The one-night event – ​​starting at 6pm on Friday November 11 – will see students cook and serve a traditional French menu of four to five courses accompanied by a glass of Beaujolais.

El Salsa closes during the winter months but offers its catering facilities for pop-up events, giving students of professional cooking and hospitality courses at Coleg Ceredigion a perfect opportunity to experience something in addition to their culinary pursuits at the college’s training restaurant.

On the menu, cheese, truffle and onion arancini, selection of vol-au-vent, onion soup with Gruyère crust, sole meunière with capers, lemon and dill, beef bourguignon with Anna apples, millefeuille with white chocolate and raspberry and a traditional French crêpe Suzette.

The cost of the evening is £25 per person, which helps fund the college’s training restaurant where students learn the art of cooking.

El Salsa will be holding its bar during the evening and booking is essential.

Huw Morgan, Professional Lecturer in Culinary and Hospitality at Coleg Ceredigion which is organizing the event, said: “We hope the public will support our students and join us at the Cardigan Center for our unique event.

“We run similar events at our Bwyty Maes y Parc training restaurant at college, but working at El Salsa will give students the experience of cooking in a different cuisine and a different style of service.”

For more information please call 01239 612032 or contact Bwyty Maes y Parc de Coleg Ceredigion on social media.

]]>
Indian food restaurant at center of Salmonella outbreak investigation https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/indian-food-restaurant-at-center-of-salmonella-outbreak-investigation/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 21:57:36 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/indian-food-restaurant-at-center-of-salmonella-outbreak-investigation/ Public Health in King County, Washington is investigating an outbreak of salmonellosis (caused by Salmonella bacteria) associated with South Indian cuisine from Chile to Seattle. The investigation is ongoing. “At this time, we have not identified how Salmonella spread through the restaurant,” public health said. He says it’s not uncommon because Salmonella can spread through […]]]>

Public Health in King County, Washington is investigating an outbreak of salmonellosis (caused by Salmonella bacteria) associated with South Indian cuisine from Chile to Seattle. The investigation is ongoing.

“At this time, we have not identified how Salmonella spread through the restaurant,” public health said. He says it’s not uncommon because Salmonella can spread through contaminated food, environmental surfaces and from person to person.

Diseases

Since October 6, 2022, three people from two separate meals have reported becoming ill after consuming food from Chili’s South Indian Cuisine in Seattle on September 17, 2022 and September 23, 2022. All people developed one or more symptoms consistent with salmonellosis, including diarrhoea, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting. No employee fell ill.

Public Health conducted interviews with people with salmonellosis to identify potential common exposures and found that they all became ill after eating foods from Chile’s South Indian cuisine.

Environmental health investigators visited the restaurant on October 19, 2022. Investigators identified sanitization issues, potential cross-contamination, inadequate handwashing, and a lack of adequate access to handwashing stations. Corrective actions were taken during the inspection. Environmental health investigators will visit the establishment within two weeks to ensure compliance with food handling practices.

No sick employee was identified at the time of the inspection. Investigators have reviewed with restaurant management the requirement that sick staff are not allowed to work until they no longer have symptoms. Investigators provided training on preventing the spread of Salmonella – including preventing cross-contamination, proper cooling methods, sanitizing procedures and hand washing.

Two of the cases have confirmatory tests indicating infections by Salmonella through culture. Both cases have the same strain of Salmonella, based on DNA fingerprinting (whole genome sequencing, or WGS) at the Washington State Public Health Laboratory. The third case did not undergo confirmatory testing but had symptoms consistent with salmonellosis and is epidemiologically linked.

About Salmonella

Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria usually does not look, smell or taste tainted. Anyone can get a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has consumed recalled products and has developed symptoms of salmonella food poisoning should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctor about possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria, as special tests are needed to diagnose salmonellosis. Symptoms of Salmonella infection can mimic other illnesses, often leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours of eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, the diarrhea can be so severe that patients need to be hospitalized.

The elderly, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop serious illnesses and serious, sometimes fatal, conditions. Some people are infected without getting sick or showing symptoms. However, they can still transmit the infections to others.

Prevention

  • Wash your hands with soap and water after using the toilet, changing diapers, touching animals, and before eating or preparing food.
  • Cook all meats thoroughly, especially poultry.
  • Wash cutting boards and counters used for meat or poultry preparation immediately after use to avoid cross-contamination with other foods.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, Click here.)

]]>