Dining space – Fuze Restaurant And Lounge http://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 21:30:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-90.png Dining space – Fuze Restaurant And Lounge http://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/ 32 32 Makeshift pandemic restaurant patio space becomes permanent in some Minnesota cities https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/makeshift-pandemic-restaurant-patio-space-becomes-permanent-in-some-minnesota-cities/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 21:30:22 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/makeshift-pandemic-restaurant-patio-space-becomes-permanent-in-some-minnesota-cities/ Dumpsters and trash cans lined the small back passage known as “garbage alley” between the brick buildings near Commercial Street in downtown Stillwater. But since a cleanup by local business owners at the start of the pandemic, the space has been converted to outdoor dining tables and ax throwing pits. And it will remain so […]]]>

Dumpsters and trash cans lined the small back passage known as “garbage alley” between the brick buildings near Commercial Street in downtown Stillwater.

But since a cleanup by local business owners at the start of the pandemic, the space has been converted to outdoor dining tables and ax throwing pits. And it will remain so for the foreseeable future.

The revitalization of Stillwater’s Union Alley is a testament to the ingenuity of Twin Cities restaurants who were forced to modify their dining establishments to comply with COVID-19 restrictions. It also shows the willingness of some municipalities to try to reduce municipal licensing red tape and compromise with its small businesses.

“On days like this, all the action is outside,” said Sara Jespersen, who led much of Union Alley’s transformation, as she stood in the middle of the room at Eat lively early Thursday evening. “I hate to say COVID was an opportunity, but it turned into her.”

Jespersen opened his ax throwing bar the lumberjack in December 2019, just months before it and other businesses were forced to close as COVID-19 spread in the spring of 2020. When restaurants were allowed to reopen later in the summer, they were only able to have dinners out, per state rules.

But the problem was that the woodcutter didn’t have a patio.

So Jespersen glanced down the smelly alley outside his back door.

“Nobody would ever walk through it,” Jespersen said, of the alley she said was known as “the armpit of Stillwater.”

Jespersen had already considered the potential of the driveway. Just before the pandemic hit, Jespersen approached several businesses that were using the alley to store their trash. As part of a mutual agreement, the group consolidated its fifty bins in and around the alley into three dumpsters and a recycling container, which made better use of the space.

In June 2020, neighboring business owner Joe Ehlenz of Lolito Cantina assisted in the process of cleaning, deodorizing and power washing the driveway. Jespersen hung lights between the buildings. A $5,000 donation from a local family helped Jespersen build two ax throwing pits and set up tables that could be used by both restaurants.

“Having that aisle available…it created momentum that gave me so much hope that we could do it,” Jespersen said.

Ehlenz said Union Alley was a godsend at the height of the pandemic, and now it’s the icing on the cake as sales have picked up and Lolito is poised to generate pre-pandemic numbers.

“I think it’s a really cool space that’s way better than it was,” he said.

In 2020, after Governor Tim Walz made changes to allow outdoor dining in June, many local cities issued executive orders relaxing rules so portions of streets and parking lots could be used for patios. .

After the peacetime governor’s emergency ended last summer, some cities have started to tighten outdoor dining rules again. But some have taken a hybrid approach to allow for particular patios.

Last February, Stillwater City Council indicated it wanted to end the city’s temporary allocation for outdoor seating in public spaces, but city officials agreed in April to approve an encroachment agreement as a pilot project to allow the Union Alley patio to continue. The city council was supportive as the driveway is not a full public street and there would be no loss of parking as the driveway was an unused and degraded area.

“Most of us know how terrible this alley used to be,” Mayor Ted Kozlowski said at the city council meeting.

Union Alley adds new energy as visitors flock to the city for outdoor activities, such as riverboat rides and Lumberjack Days, which will return in July after a two-year hiatus, Robin Anthony said. executive director of the Greater Stillwater Chamber of Commerce.

“It’s pretty amazing how busy it is,” Anthony said.

Across the metro area, other patios that have sprung up during the pandemic are also allowed to stay.

When St. Paul’s declaration of emergency expired in April and ended the mayor’s temporary allocation for outdoor seating permits and licenses, Urban Growler co-owner Jill Pavlak frantically sent an email to city staff trying to save his brewery’s extended patio, which increases the capacity of his drinking room by a third. Within a week, Urban Growler got the approvals it needed.

“What we see is that people still want to be outside. … The virus is still with us and there are different levels of comfort,” Pavlak said. “When it’s hot, people are more outside than inside.”

Brian Ingram, co-owner of Hope Breakfast Bar on the outskirts of downtown St. Paul, hopes his restaurant will also get city approval to keep its patio space, though his situation is a bit more complicated.

During the pandemic, the short stretch of Leech Street that connects Grand Avenue and 7th Street between Hope Breakfast Bar and Cafe Astoria has been blocked off for cars to allow for outdoor dining space.

Ingram asked the city to give up the street and offered to pay to turn it into private property. If an agreement is reached, it will add a capacity of 75 more seats to the 100 already served inside the restaurant.

“When COVID arrived, [the patio] became a lifeline,” Ingram said. “If we hadn’t had that, Hope wouldn’t exist today.”

Going forward, Ingram said he wants to add trees and possibly a seasonal skating rink. “We hope to be able to set a precedent,” he said.

St. Paul officials say they are working with companies that want to expand their service areas on a case-by-case basis.

Minneapolis, which is still operating under an emergency bylaw, still allows loose zoning and business licensing regulations for outdoor spaces. City workers have discussed extending benefits past the emergency expiration, but Minneapolis’ ordinances code is expected to change.

“We are still early in the exploration process with internal departments and external agencies to see if there would be a viable path to pursue outward expansions in the future,” Minneapolis spokesman John Louis said. .

In Edina, the city has allowed restaurants in the 50th and the business district of France to generally keep their slightly enlarged terraces, although they still need permits.

“We saw no reason to go back and over complicate a process that works well,” said Bill Neuendorf, Edina’s director of economic development.

In Saint-Cloud, the city has continued to allow patios along 5th Avenue for now as it tries to revitalize its downtown area.

For Union Alley in Stillwater, Jespersen plans to fundraise to commission mobile art murals and chalk art as part of an “Art Alley” concept.

“It will continue to evolve, instead of being an armpit, in a dynamic space,” she said.

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Life Time to manage facilities for the 300-meter tower in Brooklyn https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/life-time-to-manage-facilities-for-the-300-meter-tower-in-brooklyn/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/life-time-to-manage-facilities-for-the-300-meter-tower-in-brooklyn/ One of Brooklyn Tower’s swimming pools. (TheBrooklynTower.com) New York’s tallest building outside of Manhattan will have plenty of room to work out and stretch. The New York Post reports that the more than 1,000-foot-tall Brooklyn tower that recently began selling units has leased its more than two football fields of amenities space to Life Time […]]]>

One of Brooklyn Tower’s swimming pools. (TheBrooklynTower.com)

New York’s tallest building outside of Manhattan will have plenty of room to work out and stretch.

The New York Post reports that the more than 1,000-foot-tall Brooklyn tower that recently began selling units has leased its more than two football fields of amenities space to Life Time Group Holdings, which will manage the pools. , gymnasiums and co-working spaces in the building.

Long Island’s tallest tower (yes, Brooklyn is in it), which uses part of the famous Dime Savings Bank building at its base, will feature three pools and a lounging area around the historic bank’s iconic dome. , designed by Gustavino.

The so-called Dome Pool and Deck will feature a 75-foot-long adult pool, children’s pool, and hot tub, as well as decks dotted with a hammock lounge, outdoor barbecue area, sitting area, fireplace and showers. They will also be a poolside lounge and cocktail bar with a private dining area.

Indoor facilities will include five studios equipped with bars for dance, Pilates and yoga, as well as a fitness room for workout classes using cardio and strength-training equipment. A separate space will be used to house chiropractic services and other recovery techniques.

The building will also feature the city’s first Life Time Work coworking space as well as 15,000 square feet of private, open-plan workspaces and conference rooms.

Brooklyn Tower residences, where Douglas Ellima is the exclusive marketing, sales and leasing agent, range from studios starting at $875,000 to four-bedrooms for $8 million.

Developer JDS Development in March kicked off sales of the 1,066-foot, 93-story skyscraper designed by SHoP Architects at 9 DeKalb Avenue.

But you don’t need to buy to enter.

About 400 rental units — about 120 of which are designated as affordable for households earning 130% of the region’s median income — will be available below the condo floors. Most of these units will be studios or T1s.

Life Time has opened or plans to open a number of clubs in locations across New York, including Battery Park, One Wall Street, DUMBO and 23rd Street.

[New York Post] — Vince DiMiceli

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Austin restaurateurs lay claim to Lockhart: In the heart of barbecue town – Food https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/austin-restaurateurs-lay-claim-to-lockhart-in-the-heart-of-barbecue-town-food/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:19:01 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/austin-restaurateurs-lay-claim-to-lockhart-in-the-heart-of-barbecue-town-food/ Kaye Askins with her dog Chicken at Best Little Wine & Books (Courtesy of Best Little Wine & Books) We hope we don’t ruin Lockhart, but it has to be said, the barbecue capital of Texas has the makings of a diner’s paradise, distinct from the smoked meats the town is famous for. Just south […]]]>

Kaye Askins with her dog Chicken at Best Little Wine & Books (Courtesy of Best Little Wine & Books)

We hope we don’t ruin Lockhart, but it has to be said, the barbecue capital of Texas has the makings of a diner’s paradise, distinct from the smoked meats the town is famous for. Just south of Austin, the county seat of Caldwell has quietly established itself as a haven for veterans of the hospitality industry looking to expand as Austin pushes beyond its own borders.

While it might have been ridiculous a few years ago to suggest that Lockhart would in any way have such close ties to Austin’s food and drink scene 30 miles away, he indeed has supplanted more populous suburbs like Pflugerville, Del Valle and Buda as a food and drink destination, regardless of their proximity. Lockhart, Luling and Taylor are all on what was once the Chisholm Trail, an old cattle highway, which could explain Central Texans’ propensity for brisket smoking and why some of the best smoked briskets in the world date back to one of these three cities. Historically, railroads, cotton and barbecue have made Lockhart what it is today. However, this latest wave of bars, restaurants and shops, along with a handful of niche businesses like Mill Scale Metal Works, will help define what Lockhart will be like tomorrow.

Pretty Cool in Pink: Best Small Wines and Books

Against a backdrop of blue skies and white clouds, the faded red brick of the historic Brock Building (more on that story in a moment) creates a familiar triptych of color as I walk through the pink door of Best Little Wine & Books, which officially opened on April 15. Owner and wine guru Kaye Askins chooses a bottle for a first customer.

“It’s really just the little neighborhood bottle shop,” she tells me. “It’s 700 square feet, four tables, and a rotating selection of 150 wines from nearly every major region. The ambiance is all about comfort, relaxation, and accessibility.” Askins’ dog, Chicken, a local staple, climbs into my lap as I sip a glass of rosé and chat with Professor Sharon Evans, the woman Askins just turned on for a Cabernet Sauvignon from the Columbia Valley .

Books fill a corner of the windows – mostly titles by female authors on wine and food. This complements Askins’ wine selection, which is sourced primarily from winemakers who are women, minorities, and/or practice low intervention.

Comfort, relaxation and accessibility embody what is happening at Lockhart as a whole. Askins, a pi. Worth, a Lockhart native, was commuting almost weekly when several locals asked her if she planned to open a wine bar in town. It inspired a light bulb moment. “Lockhart has such a foundation for authentic Southern hospitality and open arms for women business owners. You can’t kick a rock without it being in front of a bar, shop or restaurant owned by a wife,” Askins says. “I needed this community that believed in me enough to get started.

“My goal with Best Little is to take that torch and pass it on to the Lockhart community in a light, bright and joyful space.”

Love Letters from an Old Friend: Old Pal Bar

Only 1 year old, Old Pal Bar looks like it could have stood on the corner of West Market and South Main streets for decades. “It’s kind of like my love letter to old Austin, like before,” says owner Travis Tober. “Lockhart now kind of reminds me of East Austin, old Austin, that I fell in love with.” Tober is best known for the nationally acclaimed Nickel City bar in Eastside Austin; with his bar experience, foresight and restlessness, it would make sense for him to be part of Lockhart’s new vanguard.

Old Pal offers fried chicken, jojos (seasoned, breaded, deep-fried potato wedges), agave and whiskey spirits, and ice-cold beer. There is live music on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings. Shuffleboard and darts are free on Tuesdays. This is indeed a quintessential old school Texas bar, new school Texas cooler.

Tober, who is also co-owner of Best Little Wine & Books, has no illusions that the city will soon be drastically changed: “With Tesla opening 20 minutes from here, I think the damage is done. , so let’s get the cool people out here while we can.” Maybe in a decade or so he’ll open a love letter to Lockhart in Fentress, a quaint riverside town a few miles south that hasn’t yet felt the effect of monolithic changes. from Austin.

Courtesy of Commerce Café

Crowdsourced Edibles: Commerce Cafe

Sarah Heard, co-owner/chef of Commerce Cafe with partner Nathan Lemley, grew up in Lockhart. “Quiet,” is how she kindly put it, describing the town decades ago, when insurance offices and antique shops populated the square.

Heard and Lemley, who also own Foreign & Domestic in Austin, live in Luling. After many trips through the once somewhat closed square, they kept an eye out for a vacant restaurant space in the square’s oldest building. They did their homework, then signed a lease in the 170-year-old structure.

On March 19, 2020, Governor Greg Abbott officially limited social gatherings to 10 people or fewer, effectively closing bars, restaurants, and schools; The Commerce Cafe opened on May 29, 2020, when restaurants were allowed to open at 50% capacity. Undeterred, Heard and Lemley worked to make the Commerce Cafe the answer Lockhart restaurants wanted. Their menu was first guided by a local discussion board, and menu items were tested at Foreign & Domestic.

“We looked at what options Lockhart didn’t have and put them on the menu,” Heard says. Along with a bespoke chicken fried steak, the menu is complemented by fresh pasta dishes, sandwiches and a Monday night family meal with salad, protein, plenty of sides and plain bread. Tuesday offers an all-night happy hour.

“We want to be the super welcoming coffee shop on the corner where all the locals go … but I don’t know if we’ll open for breakfast,” Heard laughs. “Breakfast is no fun to run.”

Photo by Kelly Dugan/Little Trouble

Underground blues: small problem

Housed in the basement of the Brock Building (1898) – what was once a dirt boxing gym, among other things – lurks Little Trouble. A boxing glove hangs under the stairs, commemorating this story. Clandestine vibes and a strong sense of history persist in the architecture of the underground dining room and bar.

“I wanted the menu and everything else to reflect where we are in Texas and the vibe of the place,” says Casey Wilcox, chef and co-owner of Little Trouble. “Walking into this room kind of sealed that deal.” Wilcox, former chef at Justine’s, imported an equally sultry vibe to the square, though he adorned his corner with his unique aesthetic.

Fittingly, the menu centers around German and Mexican dishes, complemented by complex flavors from harissa, miso and chimichurri. This German Mexican influence is prominent in Texas tartare: raw beef, smoked cheddar, marinated jalapeño, cilantro and fresh tortilla chips, the smoked cheddar and cilantro cooling the spice of pickled jalapeños and the dressed and spiced raw beef, the fries contributing a textured crunch. Wilcox’s cuisine is cowboy chic, rustic yet refined with classic techniques, playful in its complexity while nodding to its surroundings.

Little Trouble persevered; a miracle, considering the restaurant opened a week before Abbott’s statewide shutdown order. “We opened on March 12, 2020; we had two big services and then we were only takeout. And for a minute we were the only place you could get a drink, beyond a beer, on Sundays” , Wilcox told me.

“Travis Tober would be coming down, and I hadn’t spoken to anyone in a week. I’m just upstairs getting ready, washing all the dishes and doing the takeout…so defeated he would have come in and deliver [a speech] like a WWE wrestler. “Lockhart get up!” You’ll get there, come on man! And I would go from being very low to, ‘Okay man, we got this, we got this,'” says Wilcox, who still works 90 hours a week when it counts.

Growth is inevitable, which means people are leaving Austin and coming to Lockhart, a city united in its uniqueness and lack of big-box stores. Instead, there are restaurants, bars, shops and nice people. “It definitely looks like it’s exploding. Every week it keeps growing, everything gets busier, someone here in the food and beverage business is doing something exciting every week, the community is kind of full excitement,” Wilcox said.

According to Wilcox, who also sees an older version of Austin on these small-town streets, Lockhart has embraced them. They are riding the wave together, working to recreate those moments that inspired them in spaces where people can sympathize, toast, break bread, and inspire other pioneering entrepreneurs who can carry this shared energy into the future.


New Lockhart Hotspots

Best Small Wines and Books

210 West San Antonio

Tue-Sat, noon-9pm; Sun-Mon, closed

bestlittlewine.com

old buddy’s bar

100 E. Market

Sun-Thu, 11am-11pm; Fri-Sat, 11am–12pm

oldpalbartx.com

Trade coffee

118 S. Trade

Mon-Tues, 5pm-9pm; Wed-Thu, 11am-2pm, 5pm-9pm; Fri-Sat, 11am-9pm; Sunday closed

trade-lockhart.com

Little problem

101 E San Antonio

Mon & Wed-Thu, 6pm-12pm; Fri. & Sun., 4 p.m.–12 p.m.; Sat, 4pm-1am; Tues, closed

littletroublelockhart.com

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InterContinental Tashkent set to bring new heights of luxury to Uzbek capital https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/intercontinental-tashkent-set-to-bring-new-heights-of-luxury-to-uzbek-capital/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 09:15:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/intercontinental-tashkent-set-to-bring-new-heights-of-luxury-to-uzbek-capital/ IHG® Hotels and Resorts (IHG®), one of the world’s leading hospitality companies, today announces a first signing for its leading luxury brand InterContinental Hotels & Resorts in Uzbekistan. InterContinental Tashkent is expected to open towards the end of 2022, presenting a new modern luxury experience in the capital. This last signature follows IHG’s recent growth […]]]>

IHG® Hotels and Resorts (IHG®), one of the world’s leading hospitality companies, today announces a first signing for its leading luxury brand InterContinental Hotels & Resorts in Uzbekistan. InterContinental Tashkent is expected to open towards the end of 2022, presenting a new modern luxury experience in the capital. This last signature follows IHG’s recent growth announcementwhich will see 50 new hotels added to the global luxury and lifestyle portfolio in 2022.

Enjoying a central location, the newly built hotel will feature 216 rooms including 40 exclusive suites, two of which will be presidential suites, with stunning city views as well as expert wellness facilities and delicious dining offerings.

InterContinental Tashkent is being developed in partnership with UzTur Investment and Development as part of the brand new Trilliant Business Park development complex, which includes InterContinental Tashkent, state-of-the-art offices, premium retail space and landscaped parkland, consciously designed across three towers and a convention center.

As the cornerstone of Trilliant’s development, InterContinental Tashkent will play an important role in delivering luxury experiences in a more sustainable way, being the first example of a LEED Gold certified project in Uzbekistan. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification is a globally recognized symbol of sustainability, achievement and leadership, awarded to construction projects under development in accordance with a framework that sets criteria for efficient and sustainable businesses.

When completed, the InterContinental Tashkent will meet growing consumer demand for more conscious travel, through the provision of electric car charging stations, sustainable landscaping and thoughtful details to minimize its environmental impact. . This approach aligns with that of IHG Journey to tomorrowreinforcing the company’s commitment to sustainable growth.

InterContinental Tashkent brings InterContinental, the world’s first and largest luxury hotel brand, to a key new downtown location. This ultra-modern hotel will transform the skyline of Tashkent into one of the most remarkable modern buildings in the heart of the city. Stretching 94 meters above sea level, the exterior of the InterContinental Tashkent will be a glamorous example of artistic architecture, designed for the modern luxury traveler.

The hotel’s signature restaurant, Ember, is fast becoming one of the area’s most popular eateries, serving fire-grilled steaks, sushi, and shellfish. The Ember Bar will feature a landscaped garden with a whiskey library, cocktail menu and panoramic skyline views. Other dining options include No’mad, an all-day dining space specializing in Central Asian produce with an open kitchen and bar, and Chach, a lounge area with a pastry shop, serving coffee and plates. to share.

The hotel’s convention center will have over 2,500 m² of space – ideal for conferences, luxurious weddings and smaller-scale gatherings – with a ballroom, 10 meeting rooms and four VIP suites with breathtaking view of the city.

The InterContinental Tashkent will also lead the way in the city’s wellness and lifestyle offerings with a premium spa and health club located on the first floor. Facilities will include a 150m² swimming pool, treatment rooms, jacuzzi, sauna and steam room, split-level gym, large roof terrace and a pool bar serving smoothies and a menu of pasture.

Hotel website

InterContinental Tashkent
Tashkent, Uzbekistan

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MidAtlantic Kitchens Open Up – Kitchen and Bath Design News https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/midatlantic-kitchens-open-up-kitchen-and-bath-design-news/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 08:05:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/midatlantic-kitchens-open-up-kitchen-and-bath-design-news/ Design in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States is almost as diverse as the region itself. Encompassing Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, homes range from 19th-century Victorian homes to elegant city cottages to coastal cottages. “We work on a bit of everything,” reports Katherine Dashiell, designer, Reico Kitchen & Bath in […]]]>

Design in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States is almost as diverse as the region itself. Encompassing Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, homes range from 19th-century Victorian homes to elegant city cottages to coastal cottages.

“We work on a bit of everything,” reports Katherine Dashiell, designer, Reico Kitchen & Bath in Annapolis, MD, “and I think what interests my clients depends on their lifestyle.”

Customers in their 30s and 40s who are raising families, shopping in bulk, and entertaining friends and children’s friends are looking for things like large pantries and bulk storage, observe- she. “For them, the kitchen is a multipurpose room that needs to have a place and space for things outside of the kitchen.”

She also notes that there are plenty of 55-plus communities in her area, and that customers moving into these spaces “usually downsize. They entrusted the big family gatherings to their children,” she explains. “They are preoccupied with entertainment, but usually with smaller groups. They’re more concerned with aging in place and ease of use – most things within easy reach, pull-out trays in lower cabinets and pantries, etc.

Paul McAlary, president of Main Line Kitchen Design in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, agrees that kitchen functionality is critical. “We first try to design the space to be attractive and functional, then adapt the style to the specific taste and needs of the client,” he suggests.

“While design styles change from person to person, most people are looking for the same kind of functionality,” Dashiell notes. “Functionality seems to be the driving force.” She notes that while some people come to Reico for a new kitchen because they think their kitchen looks outdated, “most are ultimately pushed to take the plunge because the kitchen no longer works for them or their family,” she says.

McAlary observes that clients often have preconceived notions about function that aren’t accurate. “Functionality is a very universal concept in kitchen design. Usually the theories explain why they need what they have now and are used to,” he comments, adding that customers will quickly adapt to a good design once they can be convinced of it. to be more open-minded.

At Reico, the majority of customers want an island with plenty of seating, and they want to maximize storage, reports Dashiell. Items on Dashiell’s customer wish lists include cabinet inserts to customize storage and cabinets dedicated to a specific type of storage or use, such as spice drawers, pantry drawers , utensil drawers, coffee stations, charging drawers. , etc. She also sees interest in appliance garages, although the old-fashioned revolving doors have been replaced by drop-down and/or pocket doors. Microwave drawers are popular, and wooden hoods – as well as appliance panels – are also in demand.

Katherine Dashiell of Reico Kitchen & Bath notes that the kitchen has become the multi-purpose room for gathering and entertaining, with open floor plans and islands with seating among top requests. — Photo: Tim Snyder Photography

STYLE SELECTION

While function is clearly important in today’s kitchens, the look and feel of a piece is also part of a winning combination. But, different zones mean different choices for homeowners.

“Where I work, the differences from area to area seem more aesthetic,” says Dashiell. “Annapolis and surrounding areas are more coastal in terms of colors and finishes – not necessarily cottage or traditional, just light and bright with fun colors mixed in. Customers who live in and around Washington tend to lean more towards an elegant contemporary aesthetic, although that might go out the window if they live in a very traditional home. People near Baltimore are more transitional. Depending on their age and the age of the house, they could also be more contemporary.

She continues: “I think people are driven by what they want and what attracts them, but most clients – and all designers – keep the style of the house in mind when choosing finishes. .”

“Metropolitan areas differ the most from suburban and rural areas. Urban kitchens, especially in high-rise buildings and condos, tend to be much more contemporary and use laminate, acrylic, and sheet slab doors,” notes McAlary.

“Suburban areas are trending the most, and while painted shaker and recessed panel kitchens are the most popular, gray, blue, green and natural wood cabinets have started to become more popular lately, in especially for islands. Rural areas always lag far behind suburban trends and never embrace contemporary styles,” he adds. “In rural areas, natural wood cabinets are still more popular than painted ones.” While McAlary notes that Main Line Kitchen Design hasn’t sold an oak kitchen in 15 years, “we hear from our reps that in rural areas oak cabinetry is still common.”

When discussing the types of cabinets and colors customers are looking for, McAlary shares, “White shaker, white shaker, white shaker…” But seriously, he says that after a decade of white shaker, “we’re starting to see other colors – gray, blue, green and wood – and recessed panel door styles are returning. Quarter-sawn and quarter-sawn limed oak cabinets are also recent trends,” he adds.

While shaker white has been the norm in kitchens for years (above), Paul McAlary of Main Line Kitchen Design notes that other colors are on the rise, such as in the above design by Chris Rossetti.

OPENING

Over the past decade walls have come down to make kitchens more open to other living spaces.

“Years ago, everyone focused on their living room and dining room, and the kitchen was hidden away. It was a space they reserved for family and close friends,” Dashiell notes. “Now not only is the kitchen the center of the home, but people are taking over the adjacent dining room and/or formal living rooms to make more space for the kitchen.”

“In most cases, and with most customers, the kitchen is a multipurpose room,” Dashiell suggests. “Besides being the place where you cook dinner and prepare lunches, it’s the room where you meet up with your family at the end of the day, it’s where you entertain yourself when you have a party, it’s where your kids do their homework and, more and more, it can be where you sit when you work from home.

“Today more than 50% of our kitchen designs combine the dining room and the kitchen to create a larger, less formal space,” adds McAlary.

While open floor plans remain a major demand, issues have arisen with too much open space. Since COVID, adults and children are spending more time at home, and finding private spaces to work and study has become more difficult.

With the pandemic, “overnight, people went from everyone leaving the house during the day to everyone working from home and going to school virtually,” Dashiell notes.

As a result, she notes that her company has started to incorporate work areas back into the kitchen. “People worry about how to be apart and together at the same time. It has been interesting.

She notes that they’ve turned the dining rooms and extra bedrooms into offices or multi-office spaces for the kids. “People are more concerned about how to hide the noise, which has become more difficult in open plan layouts. The things people could live with before seemed to drive them crazy when they suddenly spent all their time in their homes. The need to give everyone a space, and for all the gadgets/papers/books/etc. having a specific house has become very important. ▪

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New sushi concept is coming to Aspen, hopes to stay long term | New https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/new-sushi-concept-is-coming-to-aspen-hopes-to-stay-long-term-new/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/new-sushi-concept-is-coming-to-aspen-hopes-to-stay-long-term-new/ After a successful two-week winter pop-up, Taikun Sushi Aspen returns to Marble Bar in the Aspen Mountain Residences for a full summer season. Owner Ryan Chadwick hopes the sushi concept will stick around for a while. “It did really well last winter – it was kind of a test for proof of concept and sold […]]]>

After a successful two-week winter pop-up, Taikun Sushi Aspen returns to Marble Bar in the Aspen Mountain Residences for a full summer season.

Owner Ryan Chadwick hopes the sushi concept will stick around for a while.

“It did really well last winter – it was kind of a test for proof of concept and sold out within two weeks,” Chadwick said. “Now I no longer have a long-term plan for Taikun.”

Restarting Thursday at the Marble Bar, Taikun will be open six days a week during the summer, offering two seats per night at 6:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Reservations are required through Resy, and the price per person is $150.

Taikun will offer a 13-course omakase menu, created by the native Tokyo chef Yoshikazu “Kazu” Ebina – who ran the recent month-long Taikun pop-up at the Four Seasons Hotel Miami. Although focused on maintaining a premium omakase-style experience at launch, an a la carte menu will be announced soon, Chadwick said.

In addition to beer, wine and sake offerings, craft cocktails from Marble Distilling Co. will be served at the bar before and after dinner, or throughout the meal, if one chooses.

Chadwick teamed up with Marble Distilling Co. owners Carey Shanks and Connie Baker to bring the trial Taikun pop-up to their Marble Bar Aspen space in February.

“I reached out to Connie and Carey and asked if they wanted to do a collaboration, where we would lead this sushi concept and showcase their spirits,” Chadwick said. “I wanted to make sure that [Aspen Mountain Residences] was happy with how it was all done, and when we talked about doing something more permanent there, everyone was happy to work together.

For Shanks, the Taikun concept at Marble Bar “looks, acts and works like a true partnership” with Chadwick and the Taikun team, he said, explaining how the intimate, traditional sushi experience elevates the space. and provides something special for the community.

“We want it to express a real sense of community,” Shanks said. “And not in a cliched way, but as we see these things diminish. … Marble is a community-driven company and Ryan and the Taikun team aspire to carry the same philosophy.

Going forward, Chadwick plans to maintain its Taikun Aspen concept until October, closing for the off-season and reopening for the winter – if the restaurant’s longer stay this summer meets with the success and approval of Aspen Mountain Residences, he said. Shanks also expressed hope for extending the long-term partnership.

According to Chadwick, Chadwick’s original Taikun Sushi location in New York has found success since opening during the pandemic. With an eight-seat omakase counter and private speakeasy space spanning a total of 180 square feet, the tiny Lower East Side restaurant is sold out for the next two months, he said.

The restaurateur discovered a similar intimacy in the room at the Marble Bar, which he says is “maybe 800 square feet, maybe even”. It was this intimate size and cozy bar vibe that drew Chadwick to the space — “a hidden gem,” as he describes it.

“It fits the omakase model perfectly: eight seats in the dining room, eight seats at the bar,” he said. “The space suits what we do, I don’t need a giant dining room.”

The benefits of not having to operate and staff a large restaurant in Aspen — “especially in today’s economy,” Chadwick said — also extend to the housing situation. The owner said he was able to provide accommodation in town for his Taikun staff.

Another factor that intrigued Chadwick about the location of the Marble Bar was the kitchen, as it is smaller and has no gas fittings.

“It’s limited on what you can do there,” he said. “And so I thought the space would be ideal for fish; what we prepare is very low impact.

Other location advantages include the building’s location in town and the fact that being inside Aspen Mountain Residences (formerly Hyatt Grand Aspen) creates integrated business opportunities, Chadwick said. He mentioned that people staying there have primary and direct access to Taikun reservations.

As an experienced owner of Aspen’s commercial restaurant and bar scene, Chadwick has facilitated and continues to facilitate a diverse set of concepts in spaces around the city.

He currently operates the Escobar nightclub, which has been around for 12 years, and the shorter-term Aspen Pie Shop – which is looking to close in the near future. For six years, Chadwick ran the Mill Street space adjacent to Pie Shop, cultivating a handful of establishments, such as Gray Lady, Mr. Gray and, most recently, pop-up Sushi Nakazawa. Chadwick has partnered with Daisuke Nakazawa, Executive Chef of Sushi Nakazawa in New York, to bring Nakazawa to Aspen in December 2020.

The success of this sushi experience, which featured a 21-course omakase menu, led Chadwick to explore his own sushi endeavors, and he opened the Taikun spot in New York shortly after.

“I love the omakase model, where there aren’t a lot of seats but where you can really focus on service and customer care,” he said.

With an omakase counter limited to eight seats and a lounge-style dining room nestled between two fireplaces, Chadwick sees the Marble Bar’s Taikun restaurant embodying a warm and cozy wintry vibe. He envisions the adjacent outdoor courtyard amplifying the space as a summer cocktail venue.

Chadwick said he was thrilled to keep this particular style of sushi experience in town.

“It’s important to have this style of sushi in Aspen – I love eating in Kenichi and [Matsuhisa] – I think it’s a great addition to the sushi experience,” he said.

Taikun Sushi Aspen opens Thursday for its summer run at Marble Bar in the Aspen Mountain Residences, located behind the Silver Circle ice rink on East Dean Street. Reservations are required and can be booked at resy.com.

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Take a Look Inside This Family’s Traditional Southwest Virginia Home https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/take-a-look-inside-this-familys-traditional-southwest-virginia-home/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 17:05:46 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/take-a-look-inside-this-familys-traditional-southwest-virginia-home/ Katie Bowling / A Delicious Home Turning a 1960s house into a haven for a family of five is no small feat. But for Katie Bowling, founder of A charming house, it was worth doing. Over the past three years, Katie and her husband, Philip, have worked to transform their traditional home in Southwest Virginia […]]]>

Katie Bowling / A Delicious Home

Turning a 1960s house into a haven for a family of five is no small feat. But for Katie Bowling, founder of A charming house, it was worth doing. Over the past three years, Katie and her husband, Philip, have worked to transform their traditional home in Southwest Virginia into a space they can enjoy and use to host Airbnb guests. Built in 1963, the property features historic details, large wooden windows, and an elevator they never expected to see working. While embracing the quirky designs of their Burlington home, the husband-wife duo weaved together modern, eclectic, and rustic elements to transform this former student lodge into a bright, colorful, and relaxing retreat.

Dining room

katie bowling virginia traditional house dining room

Katie Bowling / A Delicious Home

Create an eclectic look with a gallery wall and mixed dining chairs.

“I wouldn’t consider my preference to be very traditional, but I wanted the house to speak for itself,” says Katie. This involved retaining the dining room’s original chandelier and woodwork. Adding the vintage art gallery wall and mixing up the dining room chairs was how Katie incorporated her personal preferences. “I wouldn’t say I lean into the grand millennial genre much, but I like a bit more of an eclectic traditional house that adds a bit of color to make things more interesting,” she says. This is particularly inspired by his grandparents who collected antiques and his great-grandfather, who was a carpenter based in Virginia.

Have the look: Chandelier, $290, wayfair.com; Striped chairs, $229, homedepot.com; Brass vase, $18, amazon.com


The dining room

katie bowling virginia traditional house family room

Katie Bowling / A Delicious Home

Add a splash of color with an area rug.

For Katie, the family room felt like a break from the traditional elements of the house. Along with painting the woodwork white, she added a neutral-toned leather sofa and semi-colored rug as a centerpiece. “I felt the freedom of creating a comfortable space where we can sit and watch a TV show,” says Katie. “It would be a very transitional style without the rug.”

💡Tip from Katie: Find a photo of someone’s space with an area rug you like, then create a mood board to imagine what it will look like in your room.


Formal living room

katie bowling virginia traditional house formal lounge

Katie Bowling / A Delicious Home

Do not be afraid of a dark room.

When Katie’s family bought the house in 2019, they had no idea how much they loved the original molding on the living room walls. After realizing how popular they have become over the years, she decided to paint them a dark forest green to modernize the space. “I also love our formal living room, as we mainly use it for music and enjoying the fireplace,” she says. “So the room stays pretty tidy and the dark walls make a huge statement as soon as people walk in.”

With three decently sized windows, a marble fireplace and touches of white throughout, this is a special space that they say could be “out of the box” when it comes to a typical living room design.

katie bowling virginia piano traditional at home

Katie Bowling / A Delicious Home

katie bowling virginia piano traditional at home

Katie Bowling / A Delicious Home

Paint the piano.

This family heirloom was painted over twice before Katie decided to brighten it up with a vibrant pink hue. Once considered a burden for its large size, it was first painted white, then yellow, before its current color. “My husband is a musician and my kids are kind of learning to play,” Katie says. With its faux fur bench and elegant decor, it adds personality to the room’s mysterious aesthetic.


Children’s rooms

katie bowling virginia traditional house nursery

Katie Bowling / A Delicious Home

Make sure the space is convenient.

When it came to her son’s bedroom, Katie incorporated her personal style with elements that would suit a 10-year-old. This involved getting rid of the curtains (because he kept pulling them) and adding a basketball hoop behind the door. “You have to try to take some of what they love and incorporate it into the room and the walls,” Katie explains. “There are things I like, but also my son’s Patriots helmet on display.”

💡Design tip from Katie: Are you thinking, “Is there a way to take their ideas and incorporate them where they’ll love it for a longer period of time and it’s more sustainable?”

Have the look: Denim Blue Bean Bag, $83, amazon.com; White wool rug, $30, amazon.com; Yellow nightstand, $36, amazon.com

Let wallpaper be your starting point.

The girls’ room was completed last summer. Katie’s seven and two year old daughters enjoy the bright and adorably decorated space. The room was designed around Chasing Paper Puppy Wallpaper. “The wall was white for a while, but we really wanted to do a color that contrasted in a fun way,” says Katie. “I really like the way the pale blue plays with a coral orange type color.” Drawing on her love of antiques and the home’s natural style, Katie kept the room’s original chandelier, added her family’s childhood bed and purchased the swing set from Facebook Marketplace.

Have the look: Rattan chair cushion, $148, serenaandlily.com; Dollhouse, $300, target.com; Woven basket, $21, target.com

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and uploaded to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content on piano.io

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What’s Up and Coming in the Charlotte-area Culinary Scene – WSOC TV https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/whats-up-and-coming-in-the-charlotte-area-culinary-scene-wsoc-tv/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 00:21:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/whats-up-and-coming-in-the-charlotte-area-culinary-scene-wsoc-tv/ CHARLOTTE — May marked the end of the road for several Charlotte-area restaurants. In Elizabeth’s Neighborhood, Paul Verica called it quits The Stanley in mid-May after a nearly four-year run as the James Beard-appointed leader made the decision to step back from the industry. The lease and assets of this 2,800 square foot restaurant have […]]]>

CHARLOTTE — May marked the end of the road for several Charlotte-area restaurants.

In Elizabeth’s Neighborhood, Paul Verica called it quits The Stanley in mid-May after a nearly four-year run as the James Beard-appointed leader made the decision to step back from the industry. The lease and assets of this 2,800 square foot restaurant have been sold.

Also near the city centre, Bocado Bar & Diner announced on social media that it had closed its space in South End’s Atherton Mill less than a year after replacing the Big Ben Pub there. A new concept should take its place. And Rocket Pizza appears to have closed its 4,100 square foot location in the FreeMoreWest neighborhood.

In the Outlying Area, establishments that closed last month include the Local Dish, a longtime restaurant in downtown Fort Mill.

However, it wasn’t all bad news last month for local restaurants. Several new concepts debuted in May, such as Drift on Lake Wylie, a chef-inspired chophouse in Belmont that offers lake views and access.

In closer neighborhoods, Enat Ethiopian completed food stall offerings at the Optimist Hall adaptive reuse complex, and Super Abari Game Bar marked its return to Charlotte, moving from the NoDa area to a larger space in the neighborhood of Belmont.

And there are still many more additions to eat and drink. In a few days, Asheville-based Burial Beer Co. will open its bar and bottle shop in Plaza Midwood. The South End lineup continues to grow with upcoming establishments like Canopy Cocktails & Garden and Culinary Dropout; the Rea Farms development in South Charlotte will see two new spots open later this year; and a celebrity chef brings GOAT Pizza – his latest concept – to Cornelius.

For a closer look at the latest restaurant, brewery and bar happenings across the region, check out the latest episode of Restaurant Bites here.

(WATCH BELOW: Uptown restaurant reinvents itself after pandemic shutdown)

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Real estate listings on Lake Geneva for people who need a lot of living space | Local News https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/real-estate-listings-on-lake-geneva-for-people-who-need-a-lot-of-living-space-local-news/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 17:30:36 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/real-estate-listings-on-lake-geneva-for-people-who-need-a-lot-of-living-space-local-news/ Here it is, the house you’ve been waiting for! Located in the highly sought after area of ​​Park Ridge Estates, this beautiful home really has it all! With over 4,625 finished square feet, incredibly spacious, with 4 bedrooms and an option for a 5th bedroom on the first floor, 3.5 bathrooms and a fully finished […]]]>

Here it is, the house you’ve been waiting for! Located in the highly sought after area of ​​Park Ridge Estates, this beautiful home really has it all! With over 4,625 finished square feet, incredibly spacious, with 4 bedrooms and an option for a 5th bedroom on the first floor, 3.5 bathrooms and a fully finished basement. Freshly painted with attractive paint colors throughout the house. Beautiful kitchen features granite counters and island, custom backsplash, soft closing cabinets, updated lighting, new refrigerator, double oven, Bosch dishwasher, under cabinet lighting, uplighting, interior cabinet lighting and 12 inch ceramic tile. The kitchen is open to a spacious family room with a wood-burning fireplace and a huge vaulted veranda. The dining area next to the fireplace is perfect for entertaining and directly across is the formal living room with a 2nd ceramic fireplace. Head upstairs on the gorgeous plush carpet to find four large bedrooms. The master bedroom includes a sitting area, an en-suite bathroom and a huge walk-in closet. Get ready to wow your business in the finished basement with wet bar, 2 wine and beverage fridges, plenty of sitting area, 9ft ceilings, workout room with cork flooring, large bathroom with custom sink and plumbing for shower, tons of storage including a secret creeping access door. AND it doesn’t stop there… Step out into this tranquil backyard with over 50,000 landscaping investments. Plain paved patio, included hot tub, sprinkler system and French drain tile in the backyard. Custom 3-car garage with many built-ins. Newer furnace and air conditioning, sump pump with battery backup and all Anderson windows. Fantastic location close to parks, schools and downtown McHenry shops and restaurants. To hurry up! This one is a must see!

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6 peaceful houses by the lakes https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/6-peaceful-houses-by-the-lakes/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 09:09:04 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/6-peaceful-houses-by-the-lakes/ Shorewood, Minn. This five bedroom chalet on Christmas Lake is also within walking distance of Lake Minnetonka. Built in 1900 and renovated in 2000, the house includes a living room opening onto a large terrace overlooking the lake and an owner’s suite with full bathroom and adjoining office space, laundry room and vaulted living room […]]]>

Shorewood, Minn.

This five bedroom chalet on Christmas Lake is also within walking distance of Lake Minnetonka. Built in 1900 and renovated in 2000, the house includes a living room opening onto a large terrace overlooking the lake and an owner’s suite with full bathroom and adjoining office space, laundry room and vaulted living room with bar, fireplace and oversized windows. .

Accommodation

The landscaped grounds feature lawns, trees, a fire pit, a detached two-car garage, and 90 feet of shoreline on some of the clearest waters in Minnesota. $1,750,000. Ben Ganje, Lakes Sotheby’s International Realty, (651) 442-6161.

Willsboro, NY

Accommodation

Sunset Farm Estate features 645 feet of shoreline on Lake Champlain’s Adirondack Coast. The four bedroom house the traditional colors of the lake houses highlight a modern and clean-lined structure, with cherry and slate floors, a central skylight, three carved stone fireplaces, a chef’s kitchen with bar, a billiard room, a home cinema and several lounges.

Accommodation

The wooded 29.5 acre property features a landscaped patio and lawns, a barn and stone steps down to the water. $4,750,000. Jonathon Séguin, Four Seasons Sotheby’s International Realty, (518) 569-8812.

Lake Arrowhead, California

Accommodation

A private trail leads from Mallard’s Landing to a dock on the water, and Lake Arrowhead Village is just steps away. Renovated by Los Angeles designer, Brooke Wagner, this four bedroom from 1975 The A-frame home has wide-plank wood floors, slatted ceilings, gourmet kitchen, two en-suite bedrooms, loft, bunkhouse, and lake and forest views through floor-to-ceiling windows.

Accommodation

Outside, two stories of decks with glass railings, dining and entertaining areas, fire pit and hot tub. $5,999,000. Christine Williams, Keller Williams BBLA, (310) 923-8952.

Virginia Beach, Virginia

Accommodation

Frank Lloyd Wright designed this four bedroom house on Crystal Lake shortly before his death in 1959. The Cooke house has geometric dormer windows, glazed brick and red cypress walls, a copper roof, the original 40-foot built-in sofa next to a brick fireplace , an updated kitchen, new plumbing, radiant heated floors and in the west-facing hemicycle, a curved wall of floor-to-ceiling windows with sunset views.

Accommodation

The property features multi-level landscaping, a patio, deck with fire pit, and a private jetty. $2,675,000. Robin West, Rose & Womble Realty Company, (757) 816-1987.

Herbert, Mich.

Accommodation

This four bedroom house on Lake Michigan includes access to a sandy beach. Designed by Wheeler Kearns and winner of a 2015 AIA Chicago Achievement Award, the home is built of stacked structures connected by a central floating stairwell and features walls of glass, an open and elevated living space, kitchen with a large island and a roof terrace with built-ins, hot tub and lake view.

Accommodation

On the ground are trees, paths and natural grass. $3,375,000. George Lucas, RE/MAX Harbor Country, (269) 449-4068.

Beckett, Mass.

Accommodation

Located beside Long Bow Lake in the Berkshires, this three bedroom house is also close to Jacob’s Pillow and other notable sites. The home, built in 1989, has wood-clad cathedral ceilings, knotty pine floors, and an open main space that includes a kitchen with breakfast bar and living room with dining area, fireplace, and huge windows framing water views.

Accommodation

Outside, a large terrace facing the lake and a grassy and tree-lined 0.6 acre lot sloping towards the water. $425,000. John J. Burns and Shannon Margraf, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices/-Barnbrook Realty, (413) 822-5757.

This article first appeared in the latest issue of The week magazine. If you want to know more, you can try six risk-free issues of the magazine here.

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