Eating establishment – Fuze Restaurant And Lounge http://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 07:38:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-90.png Eating establishment – Fuze Restaurant And Lounge http://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/ 32 32 Sad news of closure of another restaurant in Rochester, Quiznos https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/sad-news-of-closure-of-another-restaurant-in-rochester-quiznos/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 05:56:55 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/sad-news-of-closure-of-another-restaurant-in-rochester-quiznos/ Another Rochester, Minnesota business located downtown is closing. Photo by Matthew Feeney on UnsplashPhoto by Matthew Feeney on Unsplash Quiznos in Downtown Rochester, Minnesota Closing I’m still not sure Newt’s and Hefe Rojo in downtown Rochester are closed. This news shocked me just a few weeks ago. And now it looks like another place will […]]]>

Another Rochester, Minnesota business located downtown is closing.

Photo by Matthew Feeney on Unsplash

Photo by Matthew Feeney on Unsplash

Quiznos in Downtown Rochester, Minnesota Closing

I’m still not sure Newt’s and Hefe Rojo in downtown Rochester are closed. This news shocked me just a few weeks ago. And now it looks like another place will soon be empty.

I heard on the internet today that Quiznos put up a sign saying they would be closing. You can’t always believe what the internet says, so my plan for Wednesday was to stop by and chat with the owners to see if this rumor was true. It turns out that it is. Unfortunately, another empty store will soon be opening in downtown Rochester.

A note was recently placed at the front of the store stating the following:

Quiznos is sorry to say that we will be closing after December 2. We thank you for the past 17 years and will miss you all. Happy Holidays Todd, Gerald and Vivian

Concept of confusion, question or solution

natasaadzic ThinkStock

Where is Quiznos in Rochester?

If you don’t work downtown or visit downtown Rochester, you might not even know that another world exists underground at the subway level. Restaurants, cafes, shops, banks and fun shops all exist there, including the soon to be closed Quiznos.

When the news broke, quite a few people didn’t know our town even had a Quiznos. If you were one of the many, our Quiznos was located at 101 1st. Avenue SW Ste. 11. To get there, you will need to go down to the metro level by stairs, elevator or escalator in the city center.

Good news – a new restaurant is opening in Rochester!

50 Most Popular Restaurant Chains in America

YouGov surveyed the country’s most popular restaurant brands, and Stacker compiled the list to give readers context for the findings. Read on to browse the wide and varied variety of American restaurants. You might even find a favorite or two.

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All-Vegan Cafe Takes Root in Downtown Amherst https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/all-vegan-cafe-takes-root-in-downtown-amherst/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:34:28 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/all-vegan-cafe-takes-root-in-downtown-amherst/ AMHERST — The Humble Peach, located on the former site of the Henion Bakery on Amherst’s North Pleasant Street, claims the socially conscious city’s first all-vegan establishment. But the owners say their mission is not simply to promote veganism, but rather a more sustainable form of eating and living. “It’s not as simple as not […]]]>

AMHERST — The Humble Peach, located on the former site of the Henion Bakery on Amherst’s North Pleasant Street, claims the socially conscious city’s first all-vegan establishment. But the owners say their mission is not simply to promote veganism, but rather a more sustainable form of eating and living.

“It’s not as simple as not eating meat,” says Jett Craze, who along with Jenna Gigliotti is co-owner of The Humble Peach. “There are amazing farms here, and I would never tell those people that they shouldn’t raise eggs or chickens or anything. It’s not really about that. It’s about really thinking about where your food comes from.

Opened in Amherst in May, Craze and Gigliotti hope to show customers that sustainable eating doesn’t mean sacrificing tasty food. The Humble Peach serves baked goods, such as pies, cupcakes, and banana bread, in addition to smoothies, coffee, and sandwiches to give the small space a cafe vibe. The establishment also makes its own vegan dog treats made with turmeric, flax, peanut butter, oats, and carrots (and, as the website states, they’re suitable for human consumption).

To ensure that the products sold are sustainable, Craze and Gigliotti have partnered with several farms and growers in Western Massachusetts to source all of their ingredients locally. This includes selling solar-powered maple syrup from Sunrise Farms to Colrain, organic coffee beans from Dean’s Beans to Orange and fruits and vegetables from Astarte Farms to Hadley.

“We’re really lucky in this region that there are so many great farms that have such amazing produce,” says Gigliotti, “especially in the summer, but even in the winter you can get local greens throughout the season. season”.

Residents of Amherst for five years, Craze and Gigliotti aspired to open their own cafe reflecting their sustainable food lifestyle. The name “The Humble Peach” is derived from a peach tree that Craze planted on his property several years ago which in the first year produced only one peach.

“It’s kind of an oxymoron, because a peach is more of a fancy fruit,” Craze said. “To me, that represents an incredible but also humble person.”

When the owners of the former Henion bakery announced they were retiring, Craze and Gigliotti saw their chance to move their business to the property.

The Humble Peach is only open part of the week, Thursday through Sunday. Craze says the remaining days are spent researching other ways to advocate for sustainable living, like trying to get more sustainable food options from local schools and universities, and additional plans to sell. its granola to other retailers.

“What really drives us is the goal of really changing the way people eat,” Craze said. “I want to do something with my life that will have a positive impact on the world, and that’s exactly what we’ve chosen.”

Gigliotti, a former trainer in plant-based cooking, says she also hopes to take that activity back to Amherst to educate people on how to make sustainable food.

“We’re not able to do that in our small commercial kitchen here,” she said. “But it’s definitely something I’d like to do again in the future, if I have access to some sort of community kitchen or even for individuals here.”

Alexander MacDougall can be reached at amacdougall@gazettenet.com.

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Why Ga kenkey was a taboo in Akuapem-Mamfe https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/why-ga-kenkey-was-a-taboo-in-akuapem-mamfe/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 12:47:04 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/why-ga-kenkey-was-a-taboo-in-akuapem-mamfe/ Until the mid-1990s, it was taboo for the people of Akuapem-Mamfe in the Eastern Region to eat Ga kenkey on Sundays and Mondays. It was an age-old custom in the region. It took the investiture of the head of Mamfe Akuapem, Nana Ansah Sasraku III, in consultation with his council of elders to abolish this […]]]>

Until the mid-1990s, it was taboo for the people of Akuapem-Mamfe in the Eastern Region to eat Ga kenkey on Sundays and Mondays.

It was an age-old custom in the region.

It took the investiture of the head of Mamfe Akuapem, Nana Ansah Sasraku III, in consultation with his council of elders to abolish this taboo.

But there was a sacrifice to be made; the chief and his elders still couldn’t eat Ga kenkey on those days.

In an interview with The Mirror recently, Nana Sasraku explained that the ban initially only affected Sundays, but was extended to Mondays to prevent people from eating her leftovers, if any.

The restriction

At that time, the elders of the community performed certain rites to strengthen the warriors of the city when they went to war and they believed that eating Ga kenkey could make them vulnerable, hence the ban.

The taboo was not only for the protection of the warriors but of the whole community.

However, over time, this age-old custom was revoked to allow people in the community to eat the meal.

Ga kenkey is a meal made from corn, molded into balls and wrapped in corn husks. Although it is a staple food of the Ga-Adangbes in the south of the country, it is sold on almost every street corner and eaten by people from all walks of life.

A reform

Nana Sasraku, who also serves as Kyidomhene of the traditional area of ​​Akuapem, explained that during his enlistment, he advocated a reform of this custom, which allowed the consumption of this kenkey on Sundays.

“The council decided that since Mamfe was no longer that small community and there were non-natives living among us, that should change. We even had secondary school machinery running, and there were people who left here for Accra and so on. Why shouldn’t we take it out on Sunday? He asked.

Due to a lack of consensus on this decision by traditional elders, he said, there was a delay of about a year before it was finally agreed that residents could eat kenkey on sunday.

Nana Sasraku said the decision, which was announced at an Asafosa, a community drinking festival celebrated by Mamfe residents, was met with great enthusiasm.

“I can still see in my mind the applause and what greeted that announcement. You could see people were really suppressed, in a way,” he added.

Maintain the tradition

Nana Sasraku explained that since it was the prerogative of every chief to ensure the well-being and satisfaction of his people, it became imperative to review the custom and find ways to “loosen” the ban further.

He revealed that a few years later, the traditional council met again to weigh the option of bringing the rulers to bear the brunt of the restriction to ease the burden on the townspeople.

The deliberations, he said, came to a favorable outcome, much to the delight of the people.

“The decision has been made that the council of elders, the traditional leaders of the community, will respect this ban on not eating kenkey on Mondays and which had remained,” he said.

He added that there were no repercussions from the decision since all the rites were duly performed to avoid any misfortune, hence this taboo was abolished and now the townspeople could eat Ga Kenkey without no apprehension.

Further developments

Highlighting some significant achievements during his 25 years as a leader, he said that despite the disputes that surrounded his selection and enlistment, he was successful in brokering peace between some parties engaged in conflict and working with them. to contribute to its development program for the people.

Among them, the establishment of the Mamfe Methodist Girls Senior High School and the provision of boreholes, with the support of some sponsors, to provide drinking water to the community, apart from that of the Ghana Water Company.

He called on all citizens in the region, especially those residing abroad, to support the provision of social amenities in the city.

Profile

Known in private life as Theophilus Nyanteh Akufo-Parry, Nana Sasraku succeeded her late uncle, Nana Ababio Manteaw, in 1997 at the age of 32, to become Mamfehene and Akuapem Kyidomhene on August 18.

He was educated at Okuapeman High School (OKUAS), Kwame Nkrumah University of Science (KNUST) and Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA). He is married to Mrs. Sakyibea Akufo-Parry (née Asare Ayisi), with two children.

Projects for the youth center

The Mamfehene expressed his gratitude to his immediate family, the council of elders and the people, noting that some of them had passed away.

He said that together with his council of elders, he intends to transform the town’s community center into a youth development center, which will provide space for young people, to prevent them from indulging in vices. such as gambling, alcoholism and drug abuse.

The center will have space for indoor games, theatre, art studio, information and communication technology (ICT) center and lecture halls, where certain life skills will be taught for empower young people.

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WTSA News for your Friday, November 11: https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/wtsa-news-for-your-friday-november-11/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 10:41:21 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/wtsa-news-for-your-friday-november-11/ WTSA News for your Friday, November 11: Governor Phil Scott and the Vermont Department of Labor visited GS Precision on Thursday to announce a grant of more than $228,000, which will support the establishment of a new registered apprenticeship program with the company. The money will support the advancement of apprenticeship programs, with the company […]]]>

WTSA News for your Friday, November 11:

Governor Phil Scott and the Vermont Department of Labor visited GS Precision on Thursday to announce a grant of more than $228,000, which will support the establishment of a new registered apprenticeship program with the company. The money will support the advancement of apprenticeship programs, with the company planning to add training staff, as well as update educational facilities and equipment to support the program. The announcement is part of Vermont’s efforts to promote apprenticeship programs in the state, ahead of National Apprenticeship Week, which runs from November 14-20, 2022.

A mobile home at 1 Windward Drive in Brattleboro was destroyed by fire Thursday afternoon. Chief Leonard Howard said crews responded just after 4 p.m. and brought the fire under control 45 minutes later. The sole occupant of the house and the pets were able to escape the house safely. The cause was determined to be accidental, the result of a cooking fire. The house is a total loss.

The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services says there were 1,217 new positive COVID-19 test results between Thursday, Nov. 3 and Wednesday, Nov. 9. For the previous week, the DHHS announce 17 additional deaths related to COVID-19. Currently, 27 hospitalized patients are being treated for COVID-19.

It’s Veterans Day, and Brattleboro veterans of foreign wars after 1034 will be hosting an event at their Black Mountain Road headquarters starting at 11 a.m. The national holiday commemorates the date and time an armistice was signed to end World War I in 1918. City of Brattleboro offices, except for emergency services, are closed. Brooks Memorial Library is closed. Parking is free, but other regulations will still apply.

Average gasoline prices in Vermont fell one cent per gallon from yesterday but were still up 5 cents per gallon from last week, up 18 cents from last month and 55 cents over last year. Gas Buddy says the lowest price was $3.50 in Hartford and the highest in Addison at $4.19. The national average gasoline price rose 3 cents per gallon over the past week, averaging $3.80 today. The national average is down 14 cents per gallon from a month ago and is 40 cents per gallon higher than a year ago,

Vermont Department of Mental Health formed an Eating Disorders Task Force. People who have experienced a disorder or who have one in their family are invited to a virtual meeting on Monday, November 28 at 10 a.m. to share your experiences of research and care for you or a loved one. Your feedback will be shared with Vermont health care providers, legislators and school systems.

LOTTERY NUMBERS:

TRI STATE PICK 3 0-4-1

TRI STATE PICK 4 5-7-3-4

LUCKY FOR LIFE 12-30-34-36-43 LUCKY BALL 16

MASS BOX 9-15-17-18-25

SPORTS WTSA:

Charlie McAvoy scored the game-clinching goal on his season debut as the Bruins beat Calgary Thursday night, 3-1. Boston is at Buffalo on Saturday night, puck drop at 7 p.m.

The Celtics host the Denver Nuggets tonight, tip is 7 p.m.

Thursday Night Football saw Carolina cruise through Atlanta, 25-15.

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Parisian brasserie feels so good after COVID distancing https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/parisian-brasserie-feels-so-good-after-covid-distancing/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 14:00:32 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/parisian-brasserie-feels-so-good-after-covid-distancing/ Go to the brewery, save the LA Breakfast Club, remember the insatiable critic and pioneer of food blogs. I’m Laurie Ochoa, General Manager of LA Times Food, with this week’s tasting notes. Brewery life Brasserie Lipp was opened at the end of the 19th century by a refugee from the French region of Alsace, which […]]]>

Go to the brewery, save the LA Breakfast Club, remember the insatiable critic and pioneer of food blogs. I’m Laurie Ochoa, General Manager of LA Times Food, with this week’s tasting notes.

Brewery life

Brasserie Lipp was opened at the end of the 19th century by a refugee from the French region of Alsace, which at the time had just been ceded to Germany after the Franco-German war.

(Peter Turnley/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)

The café culture triangle centered on Paris Boulevard Saint Germain is dominated by The Two Magots and Flora Coffee, where queues of tourists and a few Parisians take pride of place on the sidewalk waiting for a seat at one of the duels Left Bank literary attractions. On the other side of the busy thoroughfare, you are less likely to find a line at Lip Brewery, which is mentioned in by Hemingway “A moveable party.” Indeed, “Hemingway ate here” is a claim made by all three institutions.

With an early evening return flight ahead of me, I went as a tourist and spent my last hours in Paris over a long lunch at Lipp’s, a perfect venue to soak up the city’s romance. I suspect one of the reasons it’s a little easier to find a table at the ever-crowded Lipp is that it lacks the outdoor seating at Flore and Deux Magots — its few outdoor tables are closed. Still, after eating there the first day in Paris and two weeks later the last, I decided I could easily come to love Lipp with the same ardor I have for Hollywood. Musso & Frank Grill. Writer (and current star player of “Tár”) Adam Gopnik called Lipp “the third planet, disrupting the orbits of the other two” when he questioned the mode of Flora above Les Deux Magots for a 1996 New Yorker essay that was adapted for his book “Paris on the Moon”.

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It was dated early when we first arrived for lunch at the Lipp (there was that plane to catch) but that gave us a chance to be swept away to a main corner table from which we could watch the dining room fill up. Two French couples, perhaps grabbing a bite before a Saturday matinee (Opera Bastille organized an afternoon performance of “Salome”) sat next to us. A skillfully managed solo dinner snail pliers. The chef, a fearsome hat on the head, has reserved the VIP treatment for the distinguished guest of a table for six. Not far from there, a waiter with a long apron delights the youngest members of a family by presenting them with a dessert of profiteroles with a wink and a graceful hand blossom.

At our table, I couldn’t resist the pig’s trotter, a pig’s trotter served with mashed potatoes so creamy with butter it went beyond mashed potatoes. We also had classic herring fillets and snails, all sorts of foods that we rarely see in LA – although I have memories from a long time ago of a wonderful dish of snails and feet pork wrapped in caulking grease to Roland Gilbert and by Maurice Peguet 1990s restaurant on Melrose Avenue Tulip.

Beyond the romance of the food, it struck me as lunchtime diners filled the dining room, where groups of guests were barely inches between them and waiters had to remove the tables well set up to allow guests to sit at the banquette, which I hadn’t been to such a busy and crowded dining establishment in years – certainly not since the onset of COVID. Beyond the clinking of glasses, the laughter of friends, and the sounds of Americans trying to place their orders in English and broken French over the din, it felt good to be in a room full of humans. happy. Hopefully we’ll be done with the new pandemic variants and we’ll be able to have meals like this in Los Angeles too.

Save the Breakfast Club

A woman with pink hair grabbing sausages with tongs to put them on her plate in a buffet line.

Guests of the Los Angeles Breakfast Club gather at the Friendship Auditorium on October 12.

(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)

Writer Heather Platt shares the happy news of the rebirth of a longtime SoCal institution: “Nearly a century since its inception as a meeting place for businessmen to grab breakfast after a horseback ride along of the trails of Griffith Park, the Los Angeles Breakfast Club is thriving despite its virtual demise almost ten years ago, when there were only nine members left. When Platt visited, there were nearly 100 people “seated at long tables with paper placemats and silver carafes full of hot black coffee next to white cups of creamer packets” at the Friendship Shrine Auditorium, where the club’s 50-year lease expired. Read Platt’s full report with the early risers as they fight to keep their place in the meeting room.

The insatiable critic

A black and white photo of a woman wearing a black slouch hat.

Food critic Gael Greene in 1971.

(Ray Stubblebine/Associated Press)

Over dinner last week, The Times restaurant critic Bill Addison told me about his beginnings in learning the profession of critic. He filled a notebook full of restaurant reviews that he printed off the Internet, and between acting jobs and acting auditions, he studied the form – the descriptions of the dishes, the structure, the place to flesh out the plot of chef background. Ruth Reichl, Alison Cook and yes, Jonathan Gold were among the reviews he was studying. But when the news broke this week, this longtime New York magazine food critic Gael Greene had died of cancer at age 88, Addison wrote an appreciation that spoke of her place in her handmade textbook.

“Among my study material was a piece that I returned to several times for its scope, intelligence and boldness.” It was a 2000 review of Alain Ducasse’s attempt to bring a three-star Michelin restaurant to New York at the Essex House.

“The room is slipping,” Addison writes. “The insults are incredible. A roulade of sole is “pathetic”. She says of a rye tuile flavored with sun-dried tomato and parmesan and presented with a lot of panache: “I’m trying another one just to be sure. It’s not even a big deal. It’s a little embarrassing.

Of Greene, whose reviews frequently ran under the “Insatiable Critic” banner, Addison says, “She was a journalist but also often made a character. Her prose was unashamedly lush; she was a proud sensualist. …. In her reviews, the beards often landed like the well-done white butter she must have eaten so often in the days of French-dominated New York gastronomy: vinegary, suave, and consistent.

How Julie Powell changed food blogging

Woman in black shirt leans against shelves in a kitchen

Author Julie Powell

(Little Brown & Co.)

This week also saw the death of author and blogging pioneer Julie Powell, 49, who, as Christi Carras writes, ‘documented her year-long mission to cook every recipe in Julia Child’s book’ Mastering the art of “French cuisine” for the Salon. com blog “The Julie/Julia project”. The blog became the movie “Julie & Julia,” starring Amy Adams as Powell and Meryl Streep as Child, a role that earned her an Oscar nomination.

What few people don’t know is that, despite the film’s narrative, former LA Times Food editor Russ Parsons was the first major newspaper reporter to interview Powell about the blog, when she was halfway through the project. In his 2003 article, he wrote, “Powell’s isn’t the premier food blog, but it’s one of the few worth repeat reading. Most are devoted to “here’s what I cooked last night” or “here’s where I ate last night”. What makes ‘Julie/Julia’ different isn’t just the premise, but also Powell’s sense of humor about it. Read more of his interview here, as well as his 2009 story of when he shared what happened when he first showed Powell’s blog to Child.

The Koreatown classic returns

Stephanie Breijo has the great news that the mother-son team behind beloved Koreatown restaurant Jun Won, which closed in July 2020, is resuming operations as “Jun Won Dak, a take-out-only operation,” writes Breijo, “focusing on chicken, though a few of their signature dishes — like braised black cod, a favorite of famed Times food critic Jonathan Gold — will also be making a comeback. On November 21, they hope to hold the grand opening of Jun Won Dak.

fate

On November 16, we welcome fate, a new LA Times newsletter that Tasting Notes readers will want to check out. Arts journalist Steven Vargas prepares a list of the best events of the week. As Vargas says, “I’m going to share the top five things to do right now, along with suggestions for your nightly or daily date with the kids, a warning about tickets on sale (or on sale for free!) And a preview of these must-see shows ends soon. From time to time, I’ll bring some tips straight from the source – sharing what LA artists have to say about what to see and where to find it. You here.

“And while we’re talking about going out: Bill Addison is in the home stretch to choose and write the restaurants that will make its list of The 101 Best Restaurants in Los Angeles, but tickets for the announcement night are already on sale and are going fast. Early bird tickets are gone, but there are still tickets available for the December 6 event at City Market Social House in downtown Los Angeles Learn more on our events site.

— Finally, with the end of Halloween, many are already starting their holiday gift shopping. Our foodie gift guide was released this week along with several other buying guides. Wooden cutting boards left over from the making of musical instruments, modern molcajetes and exceptional tea are some of the suggestions. My pick is the hot sauce collection from Gilberto Cetina restaurant Holbox.

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Are container bars the future of the bar scene? https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/are-container-bars-the-future-of-the-bar-scene/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 19:30:18 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/are-container-bars-the-future-of-the-bar-scene/ The future of the bar as we know it lies in Bean Town. This is the container bar of Yellow Door Taqueria, a model establishment that has successfully weathered the pandemic. And that’s shaping the way bars move into the future. The bar opened this summer in Boston’s South End. The menu includes specialty cocktails, […]]]>

The future of the bar as we know it lies in Bean Town. This is the container bar of Yellow Door Taqueria, a model establishment that has successfully weathered the pandemic. And that’s shaping the way bars move into the future.

The bar opened this summer in Boston’s South End. The menu includes specialty cocktails, a family of margaritas, and even mezcal shots. But it’s the nature of the bar itself, set in a shiny red container on an expansive patio, that’s part of a larger food and drink trend.

“It was a creative and fun way to enhance the experience for our customers who prefer to dine out, which isn’t permanent or extremely expensive to run,” says Colleen Hagerty, co-owner of Yellow Door Taqueria. “COVID protocols will forever be integrated into our current and future standard operations. The introduction of a container bar brings an indoor dining experience to the outdoors where many post-pandemic patrons prefer to dine.

In accordance with city regulations, the bar will remain open until December, offering patrons alfresco cocktails, food and cocktails to go. It will reopen next year after the off-season (the restaurant will of course remain open). The menu is rich in tacos, inspired by Californian and Mexican cuisines. It’s the kind of food and drink you want to eat outside, if you can, because it brings to mind a barren Mexico City street.

What makes it the sign of the times? In short, nailing down all the little things restaurants have had to do to stay relevant during the pandemic. This includes an inviting outdoor dining space, creative workarounds (a container bar, instead of an expensive build), forward-thinking, building a strong staff, and, of course, items to carry. “Takeout is the new normal and we would much rather our customers had the option to purchase our craft beverages to help keep those sales in-house,” says Hagerty. “Takeout was and is a lifeline in navigating the pandemic.”

It’s no wonder the bar is a hit, with well-made drinks and an environment that’s both fun and friendly. Restaurants across the country have similarly adapted, putting loans to good use through patios, alleyways, rooftops, and more. innovative. Yellow Door has not only endured the past few years, but gracefully blended in, embracing a restaurant crowd that has changed forever.

Chips and dip from Yellow Door Taqueria.

So what advice would Yellow Door give to other restaurants trying to get by? “Invest in your front and back office teams and in the elements of the business that will enable you to be successful in the long term. You really have to think about three years because so many new restaurants fail in that time frame,” says Hagerty.

She recently participated in auctions where expensive equipment from bankrupt catering companies is sold, such as $1,000 bar stools and $10,000 coffee makers. “The $1,000 stool isn’t going to make poorly executed menus taste better or improve poor customer service,” she says. “A $40 martini glass won’t fix a drink that’s poorly made by an untrained bartender.”

These days, we crave the restaurant experience, perhaps more than ever. This experience is a combination of factors, some old (great food and service), some born out of the pandemic (outdoor options, social distancing). We’ve lost a lot since 2020, but many of the best are making smart progress. Customers are having it pretty well right now and it makes us excited to eat and drink in the future.

“The reopening of restaurants after the peak of COVID has brought so much happiness and joy to people who have lost pieces of themselves in the quarantine stage of the pandemic,” says Hagerty. “Sharing meals together is the love language of many people. Dating, birthdays, family members flying in, the first question is always ‘Where should we eat?’ restaurants give cities their energy and there was real loneliness without them during COVID.

Editors’ Recommendations






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Restaurant inspection | Republic News https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/restaurant-inspection-republic-news/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 04:03:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/restaurant-inspection-republic-news/ The information below was compiled from Bartholomew and Johnson County Health Department reports. Critical violations can expose customers to illnesses and should generally be corrected immediately or within days. Non-critical violations, if left uncorrected, may result in critical violations or make critical violations more likely to occur. not Lucabe Coffee Co. 2531 Eastbrook Square September […]]]>

The information below was compiled from Bartholomew and Johnson County Health Department reports. Critical violations can expose customers to illnesses and should generally be corrected immediately or within days. Non-critical violations, if left uncorrected, may result in critical violations or make critical violations more likely to occur.

not Lucabe Coffee Co.

2531 Eastbrook Square

September 26

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 1

not Chili’s Grill and Bar

1079 National Highway North

September 26

Critical Violations: 2

Food contact surfaces of equipment and utensils should be kept clean to sight and touch. The pop gun behind the bar is soiled with a buildup of a mildew-like substance. The hand washing sink should only be used for hand washing purposes. A wiping cloth was stored in the sink for washing hands behind the bar.

Non-critical violations: ten

not from Arni

2765 Brentwood Drive

September 26

Critical Violations: 1

The hand washing sink should not be used for any purpose other than hand washing. The hand washing sink had been used as a dump sink, as evidenced by the ice it contained.

Non-critical violations: 8

not Hardee’s

1200 North Hartman Drive, Edinburgh

September 27

Critical Violations: 1

A back anti-siphon device installed on a water supply system must meet the standards for that specific application and type of device. The atmosphere vacuum breaker on the mop sink is not known to be under constant pressure, therefore the nozzle should be prepared.

Non-critical violations: seven

not Chipotle Mexican Grill

2260 national road north

September 27

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 2

not Otter Creek Golf Course

11522 East State Road 50N

September 27

Critical Violations: 1

Insufficient supply of chemical disinfectant in the dishwashing machine. Use 3 bay sinks until the power supply is replaced.

Non-critical violations: 5

not willow leaves of hope

326 Jackson St. Hope

September 27

Critical Violations: 1

Sauce in a glass bowl stored in a cold plate cooling unit measured at 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Foods that are potentially dangerous for cold storage should be kept below 41 degrees Fahrenheit.

Non-critical violations: 3

not The Irwin Garden Inn

608 Fifth Street

September 27

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 5

not Taco Bell

1105 25th Street

September 28

Critical Violations: 1

Employee beverages should be in closed containers and stored in a manner to prevent potential contamination while in the food preparation area.

Non-critical violations: 5

not At Angotti

217 Washington Street

September 28

Critical Violations: 1

An employee drinks from an open container stored in the food preparation area.

Non-critical violations: 3

not Chopstick restaurant

3045 Columbus Center

September 18

Critical Violations: 5

Employee eating in the preparation area. Employees must eat, drink and smoke in the designated area. Eggs stored on chopped vegetables in a cold room. Raw animal products should not be stored above ready-to-eat foods. Many ready-to-eat foods do not have a label date. Ready-to-eat foods should be labeled with the date of the day they are cooked or prepared. The can opener blade is very dirty. Food contact surfaces should be free of food debris and soil. The rear hand sink has several buckets stacked in front and a pair of tongs sit in the sink. Hand washing sinks must be unblocked, easily accessible and ready for use at all times.

Non-critical violations: 11

not central cafe

1606 Central Avenue

September 29

Critical Violations: 1

Potentially hazardous foods should be stored at appropriate temperatures. This includes hot foods at 135 degrees Fahrenheit or higher and cold foods at 41 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. – on the steam table measured 110 degrees Fahrenheit and the fried potatoes measured 97 degrees Fahrenheit.

Non-critical violations: 13

not Kroger

3060 north national road

September 29

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 2

not St. Peter’s Lutheran Church and School

319 Fifth Street

September 29

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 3

not Flat Rock – Hawcreek Campus Kitchen

9423 Northern National Road 9

September 29

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 5

not Sushi

3820 25th Street

September 29

Critical Violations: 1

Scallops measured at 53 degrees Fahrenheit in the upper portion and chicken measured at 51 degrees Fahrenheit in the lower portion of the prep cooler accessed across from the grill line. Foods that are potentially dangerous for cold storage should be kept below 41 degrees Fahrenheit. Potentially hazardous foods should not be stored in this cooler until the cooler can keep below 41 degrees Fahrenheit.

Non-critical violations: seven

not AFC Sushi

3060 north national road

September 29

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 1

not Tacolumbus

1637 National Road

September 30

Critical Violations: 1

Poisonous or toxic materials should be stored in a manner that does not contaminate food, equipment, utensils, and disposable and single-use linens. A box of Raid was found next to clean sheets and tomatoes on a shelf in the rear storage area.

Non-critical violations: 4

not Ru Yi

2125 West Jonathan Moore Pike

September 30

Critical Violations: 1

The container of raw eggs was measured at 70 degrees Fahrenheit on a shelf next to the cooking woks. Potentially hazardous foods should be stored above 135 degrees Fahrenheit or below 41 degrees Fahrenheit.

Non-critical violations: 6

not Dairy Queen Grill and Chill

2215 Columbus Center

September 30

Critical Violations: 2

Several employees drink in the food preparation area that do not use straws. Employee drinks in the food preparation area should have straws and be covered to prevent food contamination and to avoid contaminating surfaces of drinks that come in contact with employees’ mouths. The can opener blade is very dirty with old food particles.

Non-critical violations: seven

not Target Store/Food Store

1865 national road north

September 30

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 1

not Target store/Starbucks

1865 national road north

September 30

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: 1

not New sideboard from China

2678 Eastbrook Square

October 6

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: None

not Guéara’ Mexican Restaurant

3932 25th Street

October 6

Critical Violations: 1

If foods of animal origin such as beef, eggs, fish, lamb, duck, poultry, pork or shellfish are served raw or undercooked, the customer should be informed by the through a notice to customers indicating “the consumption of raw or undercooked foods of animal origin”. increases the risk of foodborne illnesses. Currently the establishment does not have a customer council.

Non-critical violations: None

not Orange and Gray

5555 Inwood Drive

October 7

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: None

not The loaded fork

5555 Inwood Drive

October 7

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: None

not Sushi

3820 25th Street

October 12

Critical Violations: None

Non-critical violations: None

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Houston Bakery’s Pudgy’s Fine Cookies Bakes ‘Thick AF’ Cookies in the Heights https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/houston-bakerys-pudgys-fine-cookies-bakes-thick-af-cookies-in-the-heights/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 19:24:17 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/houston-bakerys-pudgys-fine-cookies-bakes-thick-af-cookies-in-the-heights/ Being in the cookie business isn’t always pleasant, according to Van Teamer, owner of Heights Pudgy’s Fine Cookies Bakery. The Heights shop, which first launched as a pop-up around two years ago, has been offering small batches of North Shepherd biscuits since late July and has established a reputation for dense treats the size of […]]]>

Being in the cookie business isn’t always pleasant, according to Van Teamer, owner of Heights Pudgy’s Fine Cookies Bakery. The Heights shop, which first launched as a pop-up around two years ago, has been offering small batches of North Shepherd biscuits since late July and has established a reputation for dense treats the size of children. ‘a palm and smartly named that’s slimy in the middle and shareable, because as Teamer says, “What’s the point of eating alone?”

There are hot buttery Sugar Babies with sprinkles, PB Sensation cookies wrapped with peanut butter, and Against the Grain gluten-free chocolate chip cookies. Best sellers include a custard-filled Bananza Brule cookie that’s burnt on top, the Wild Campfire s’mores cookie, and then the unmistakable Thickerdoodle, a bold name for the bakery’s version of a snickerdoodle, as well as a rotation of seasonal flavors, like the recent Turtle Power loaded with pecans and the What’s Poppin Pop-Tart-inspired cookie with strawberry rhubarb jam.

“We keep a lot of traditional flavors, but we try to reach a wide range of people of all ages, from older to younger,” she says. This often means striving to make the cookies tasty, but not too sweet. Yet, Teamer points out, the quality of the cookie comes down to preference — her and her family’s preference — which just happens to be “thick AF.”

Pudgy’s Fine Cookies bakes treats in an assortment of fun flavors.
Brittany Britto Garley

Although the cookies have received praise and devout fanfare, like any small business, Teamer says it has faced criticism while sparking some curiosity in others.

Some took issue with the cheeky “thick AF” tagline or the soft texture of the cookies, which is emphasized in Pudgy’s “a little bit of crunch, a lot of gooey” tagline. Others criticized the store’s model, which bakes small batches of cookies each day, selling them for limited hours or while supplies last. But Teamer remains faithful to its model. “It’s just like, ‘I’m sorry. That’s how we like it, and we hope you like it too,'” she said.

Creating a company she’s proud of and cookies that have the perfect texture, taste and appearance is a laborious process in itself — full of science-like experiments and days of taste testing, she says.

“If it’s not good, we make the same cookie over and over until we get it,” she says. “Then we think of the flavor, and we think of a weird and fun name for it.”

Teamer’s successful foray into the world of desserts is unconventional, especially since she had no culinary or real-life cookie experience before Pudgy’s.

Growing up in a Vietnamese family, Van Teamer says the dessert was generally less sweet than most American treats, often made with a combination of beans, rice and coconut. The only cookies she ate were baked from premade cookie dough at the grocery store or purchased from the Great American Cookies chain bakery.

Teamer, who worked as a dental hygienist, says knowing the drudgery and hustle and bustle involved, she never wanted to own her own business either, but her husband encouraged her. “I just see you doing so much more,” she recalled telling him.

The married couple started looking for something to do for their family, and when COVID hit, they decided to start a business that would focus on cookies. And after researching bakeries and cookie franchises, but seeing none that she or her family could align with, Teamer decided to start her own cookie business.

A glimpse of the Pudgy's Fine Cookies storefront, which features t-shirts, hats and a neon sign that reads 'Thick AF'.

Pudgy’s Fine Cookies owner Van Teamer set out to create a brand that is carefree and allows customers to embrace their inner “plump” child.
Pudgy Fine Biscuits

Teamer and his sister Ann Ngyuen soon began experimenting with recipes that emphasized fresh ingredients, meaning no preservatives, additives, or artificial ingredients; the norm being that all cookies had to be baked the same day they were served. “We do it the way we like it to taste, and we hope everyone likes the taste too,” says Teamer.

They also branded the cookies with a memorable face — the retro hipster cartoon boy, Pudgy, who Teamer says represents everyone’s inner “chubby” child and inhabits a playful, happy vibe she wanted for her shop. .

Eventually, the cookies became a hit within their friends and family circle, and in November 2020, Teamer’s family started hustling – hosting pop-ups at various local markets, restaurants and bars, including Kicking Kombucha , Teaspresso, Railway Heights and Tenfold Café. “We were pretty desperate,” she says. “Whoever allowed us to be [at their establishment]we were there.”

Pudgy’s soon began taking online orders and wholesale its cookies to various establishments while cooking in the Teamer family’s garage. Eventually, “people got tired of chasing Pudgy’s,” Teamer says, and growing tired of people coming to her house, Teamer decided to seek out a space of her own. After hearing about a location up high across from what would be Houston’s largest Kroger, Teamer jumped at the chance, opening the storefront at 1010 North Shepherd Drive in conjunction with the ice cream company of his friend Josh Delon, Underground Creamery. (The two now share a kitchen space.)

Van Teamer, daughter Taylor and sister Ann Ngyuen decked out in Pudgy t-shirts, at Pudgy's Fine Cookies bakery.

Van Teamer officially launched its cookie and bakery company Pudgy’s Fine Cookies storefront in July after years of operating as a pop-up.
Alain Castelan

Since then, Teamer says the bakery has received great support. The grand opening on July 31 had people lining up an hour before the event, which felt like a big party. And in many ways, Pudgy’s is still a festive, family affair. His daughter Taylor helps run the bakery storefront, Teamer still manages the shop’s marketing and social media, and her sister Ngyuen is often found in the back of the shop helping cook up cookie recipes that the husband from Teamer is still testing. And although Teamer plans to expand her cookie empire, she’s still willing to make cookies her own way.

Quality, above all else, she says, is always her goal.

Pudgy’s is open from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The bakery is closed on Mondays. Available for delivery.

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Restaurateur Keith McNally bans establishment of James Corden https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/restaurateur-keith-mcnally-bans-establishment-of-james-corden/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 22:03:22 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/restaurateur-keith-mcnally-bans-establishment-of-james-corden/ James Cordon is officially banned from the famous SoHo restaurant Balthazar and any other establishments owned by the restaurateur Keith McNally after the owner shared some of the comedian’s behavior at a dinner party in the past. McNally, who also owns several other restaurants in New York, including Pastis and Minetta Tavern, blasted Corden on […]]]>

James Cordon is officially banned from the famous SoHo restaurant Balthazar and any other establishments owned by the restaurateur Keith McNally after the owner shared some of the comedian’s behavior at a dinner party in the past.

McNally, who also owns several other restaurants in New York, including Pastis and Minetta Tavern, blasted Corden on her Instagram in a new post.

Sharing a photo of Corden, McNally wrote in the caption, “James Corden is an extremely gifted comedian, but a little moron of a man. And the most abusive customer to my servers Balthazar since the restaurant opened 25 years ago. years. I often do 86 a customer, [but] today I have 86’d Corden. It didn’t make me laugh.”

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Munchies Peri Peri, Gravesend, speak out against mouse infestations and undercooked food https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/munchies-peri-peri-gravesend-speak-out-against-mouse-infestations-and-undercooked-food/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/munchies-peri-peri-gravesend-speak-out-against-mouse-infestations-and-undercooked-food/ A peri-peri chicken takeaway has hit back at what it calls “prejudicial” accusations suggesting it has a rodent problem and is serving undercooked food. Munchies Peri Peri, in Gravesend, has come under fire from customers who say they saw mice on the premises and claim they were served raw meat. Customer Jimmy Babalola, the founder […]]]>

A peri-peri chicken takeaway has hit back at what it calls “prejudicial” accusations suggesting it has a rodent problem and is serving undercooked food.

Munchies Peri Peri, in Gravesend, has come under fire from customers who say they saw mice on the premises and claim they were served raw meat.

Customer Jimmy Babalola, the founder of GTown Talents, had entered the chicken shop at 10:30 p.m. last Saturday to grab a bite to eat.

However, after paying £16 and sitting down to have a meal with his friend, the 32-year-old saw two mice entering and leaving the premises through the front door.

The community worker claimed staff had turned a blind eye, but bosses said pest control companies had confirmed there were no rodents living on the premises.

Mr Bablola said: “I was really disgusted. As soon as we saw them, we told the store staff several times and they ignored us, it was like they knew it was happening.

“The worst thing is that customers eat there and have no idea.

Munchies Peri Peri in Gravesend. Picture: Munchies Peri Peri

“Mice were going in and out of the entrance in collapsing places in the store.

“To me, it clearly seemed like they were living there and that’s not right.”

Jimmy claimed he told the store owner at least five times, but felt like he was deliberately ignored.

He added: “In the end they closed the store and the staff were rude.”

The Gravesend resident complained directly to the store and initially received no response to his message.

Jimmy Babalola, founder of Gtown Talents, claimed there were rodents at Munchies Peri Peri in Gravesend
Jimmy Babalola, founder of Gtown Talents, claimed there were rodents at Munchies Peri Peri in Gravesend

He then contacted the council and posted about his visit on social media.

After his message, many others started talking about their own experiences.

A woman, who did not wish to be named, filmed a mouse inside the premises four months ago.

She said: “The video was taken on July 23.

“I was walking past the store when it was closed and there were four mice running around the store.”

A mouse seen inside Munchies Peri Peri
A mouse seen inside Munchies Peri Peri

Speaking about the mouse allegations, a spokesperson for Munchies Peri Peri said: “On Saturday between 10.30pm and 11pm we had two customers who noticed mice entering our premises from outside.

“They reported it to our member of staff who reported it to the manager.

“The staff are not trained to catch mice nor is it their job to do so, at the time the customer had already scared the mouse away and it ran outside.”

The spokesperson explained that the night Mr Babalola visited and the mouse was seen, the manager asked staff to ensure that the floor was cleaned from where the animal was.

They added: “Because it was the weekend and the pest control contractors only worked during the week, we arranged for them to visit us this week.”

Munchies Peri Peri, in Gravesend.  Photo: Munchies Peri Peri Google
Munchies Peri Peri, in Gravesend. Photo: Munchies Peri Peri Google

Munchies says a regular pest control contractor, Monitor Pest, visits the site every four to six weeks.

The spokesperson said: “We have already reported this incident to them and are currently awaiting a visit from them.”

This was due to take place on Wednesday and pending this visit the company confirmed that it had called another independent pest control contractor called Ebbsfleet Pest Control.

The contractor visited the store on Tuesday and filed a report, a copy of which Munchies provided to KentOnline.

The spokesperson added: “The contractor has ruled out any signs of mice or rats living on our premises, including the basement.

The door where a customer claimed to see rodents entering and exiting Munchies Peri Peri.  Picture: Munchies Peri Peri
The door where a customer claimed to see rodents entering and exiting Munchies Peri Peri. Picture: Munchies Peri Peri

“However, they did mention finding signs of rodents outside the store in the alleys – these are not managed by us and are outside our premises.

“Following this incident, we concluded a deep cleaning of our store and closed early on October 10 to complete it.

“We have also implemented additional checks to be carried out every three hours until we are satisfied that no mice are near the premises.”

Munchies said the next Independent Pest Control visit is expected to take place next week.

The spokesperson said: “We did not initially respond to the customer who filed the mouse complaint as it was sent out of office hours.”

‘We have completed a deep cleaning of our store’

Other complaints about allegedly undercooked food had also been filed against the restaurant in February.

A woman, who also did not wish to be named, posted about Munchies sharing photos of the burger served to her.

She posted photos of a seemingly undercooked burger and urged others not to eat out.

She said: “I got a burger from them in February and when I complained they said it was supposed to look like this.

“I kept telling them otherwise and said I wanted a refund.

The undercooked burger at Munchies Peri Peri for which a customer was reimbursed in February
The undercooked burger at Munchies Peri Peri for which a customer was reimbursed in February

“I finally got one, but then I got messages from a few people at the company asking me to take my message down and that I was wrong.

“I was pregnant at the time and actually ate part of the burger not realizing it could have been much worse.”

In a response to the lady’s message, Munchies acknowledged there was a problem and the food was not up to par, but said after contacting the woman they never heard back. ‘them.

The message read: “We can assure you that there is definitely something wrong here. We are on it and will get back to you soon.

“Excuse me for the inconvenience, we need to do some checking before letting you know what’s wrong here.”

The undercooked burger at Munchies Peri Peri for which a customer was reimbursed in February
The undercooked burger at Munchies Peri Peri for which a customer was reimbursed in February

Munchies opened in March 2021 despite negative claims the takeout holds the highest food hygiene rating of five, which came a month after it opened.

Gravesham Borough Council, the authority responsible for environmental health and food safety assessments, confirmed officers had received a complaint and were in contact with the establishment.

Some comments in online customer reviews suggested that the food served by Munchies was allegedly undercooked and pink.

The takeaway defended its cooking methods, adding: “We have proven our cooking methods to the council on several occasions.

“Our marinating process contains food coloring and because of this our chicken sometimes looks pink, we have proof emails from the board confirming this.”

“The two people who ate the meal now have food poisoning”

A Google review gave the takeaway a star.

Becca Higgins posted: “Bought a meal last night it was awful. Wasted £35 on two meals, food tasted like cardboard, wasn’t even hot, tasted like it had been warmed up.

“The two people who ate the meal now have food poisoning. Not good and will never come back!”

Another reviewer, Ajay Bunger, said: “The food was terrible, the wings were pink, undercooked and not fit to eat.

“The burgers weren’t cooked properly and I tried to contact Munchies on their phone number but no one seems to be answering the phone waiting for my refund from Just Eat.”

Evidence of Munchies Peri Peri contact with Monitor Pest Control.  Picture: Munchies Peri Peri
Evidence of Munchies Peri Peri contact with Monitor Pest Control. Picture: Munchies Peri Peri

On the JustEat delivery app, Munchies is rated four stars out of six – with critical reviews focusing on delivery issues.

Charlotte rated the food six stars, saying, “The food arrived quickly and hot. Delicious! Will be ordering again.”

Ryan rated the food four stars, saying: “The half chicken wasn’t very good and quite inedible, the wings on the other hand were unreal.”

There were several other six star reviews with no comments.

The Munchies spokesman added: “Misrepresentation about any business, especially the food industry, ruins its reputation and during this difficult time when all small businesses are worried about bills and rising cost of food is the last thing we wanted to happen.

Confirmation of Munchies Peri Peri's contract with Monitor Pest Control.  Picture: Munchies Peri Peri
Confirmation of Munchies Peri Peri’s contract with Monitor Pest Control. Picture: Munchies Peri Peri
Munchies on Just Eat.  Image: Just eat
Munchies on Just Eat. Image: Just eat

“Obviously mice have entered our store from the street and also run away, we keep the doors open to let customers know we are open.

“We understand it’s important to raise concerns if something goes wrong, but the intentions behind it should be good.

“I hope that after all the work we have done, customers who have complained about us on social media will also post an appreciation for our efforts.”

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