Eating establishment – Fuze Restaurant And Lounge http://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 06:08:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-90.png Eating establishment – Fuze Restaurant And Lounge http://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/ 32 32 Why Europe Needs the World’s Largest Bitcoin Conference https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/why-europe-needs-the-worlds-largest-bitcoin-conference/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 00:30:00 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/why-europe-needs-the-worlds-largest-bitcoin-conference/ The Bitcoin Conference 2022 team will plant their flag in Amsterdam, bringing the world’s largest Bitcoin event to Europe. This is an opinion editorial by Brandon Green, the Chief of Staff of BTC Inc. Disclaimer: BTC Inc is the parent company of Bitcoin Magazine. At Bitcoin Magazine, we have worked hard to increase the visibility […]]]>

The Bitcoin Conference 2022 team will plant their flag in Amsterdam, bringing the world’s largest Bitcoin event to Europe.

This is an opinion editorial by Brandon Green, the Chief of Staff of BTC Inc. Disclaimer: BTC Inc is the parent company of Bitcoin Magazine.

At Bitcoin Magazine, we have worked hard to increase the visibility and voice of the Bitcoin movement. We have created a website to share news and ideas, some social media accounts to break news and spread memes, a print magazine to capture and spread bitcoin culture, a media team to create bitcoin content of all types, and a bitcoin conference to bring everyone together and shine the spotlight on industry.

Our last conference, Bitcoin 2022, ended up being not only the biggest Bitcoin conference in the world, but also the biggest financial conference and one of the biggest cultural events in the world. But it’s a US-centric event, with mostly US-centric speakers, companies, and attendees.

Bitcoin is not just an American phenomenon.

Bitcoin is global, and it’s time for Bitcoin Magazine to become more global as well. Bitcoin Magazine’s ultimate goal is to grow the Bitcoin movement across all continents and languages. We have started to establish the brand in various countries around the world (more on this in later updates). Now we are excited to launch Bitcoin Amsterdam, our first conference outside of the United States.

Bitcoin Amsterdam follows in the footsteps of Bitcoin 2014, the second Bitcoin conference ever, which was also held in Amsterdam. Like Bitcoin 2014, we will bring together the European Bitcoin community and others from around the world to celebrate, teach, collaborate and learn more about Bitcoin. Europe has been a hotbed of Bitcoin innovation, with many of our most prolific developers and brightest entrepreneurs hailing from the continent. And yet, while there are great conferences for hardcore Bitcoiners and developers, we don’t have a gathering place for people ranging from the curious to the convict to come together and build the movement in Europe. It’s time to change that.

The goal is not just to bring Bitcoin 2022 to Europe, but to plant a flag for the world’s largest Bitcoin conference, featuring the luminaries, cypherpunks, freedom fighters, celebrities and geeks of Europe and elsewhere who can articulate and highlight how Bitcoin is changing the world from scratch.

The people, businesses and communities that our movement nurtures in the bear market will be most primed for explosive growth in the bull market. Europe is ready for a bitcoin transformation. Don’t sit and watch it happen – join us to make it happen! If you have a business that needs to be built, an idea that needs to be shared, or relationships that need to be nurtured, Bitcoin Amsterdam will be the best opportunity to do so. And of course, if you just want to get started with your fellow Bitcoiners, the drinks will be flowing and the city will be waiting for you.

Come build the movement with us. Don’t miss!

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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The human price of tea https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/the-human-price-of-tea/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 06:42:24 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/the-human-price-of-tea/ With one in eight people around the world at risk from a deadly heatwave in South Asia that has already claimed nearly 100 lives, it’s time to recognize that the climate crisis is a health crisis. It is not an isolated problem. In South Africa, recent floods have claimed more than 400 lives, across the […]]]>

With one in eight people around the world at risk from a deadly heatwave in South Asia that has already claimed nearly 100 lives, it’s time to recognize that the climate crisis is a health crisis.

It is not an isolated problem. In South Africa, recent floods have claimed more than 400 lives, across the Sahel violence and insecurity are on the rise as people struggle with hunger, malnutrition and other factors exacerbated exponentially by climate change, and in places like Colombia, health and food security are at their worst. as floods displace communities and trigger epidemics.

This is the most pressing health and humanitarian challenge of the 21st century. A quarter of a million people are expected to die each year from climate change between 2030 and 2050 if we do nothing about it, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Climate change affects the social and environmental determinants of health – clean air, safe drinking water, sufficient food and safe shelter. According to the recent IPCC report on climate change, climate change has adverse effects on human health ranging from mortality from extreme events, morbidity from rising temperatures and heat waves, malnutrition and susceptibility to disease.

And for the first time ever, the IPCC report includes mental health as a key area affected by the climate crisis, noting that climate change has adversely affected the physical and mental health of people around the world.

People are losing their homes and loved ones as conflicts erupt over scarce resources in places like the Lake Chad Basin, and they dread the stress as we face the prolonged impacts of COVID-19 and the specter of other zoonotic pathogens that will increase as heat and environmental damage push animals out of their traditional areas, according to Harvard.

And even as countries and communities emerge from the COVID-19 crisis, it is clear that the pandemic has reinforced pre-existing structural inequalities, heightened systemic challenges and risks, and threatens to reverse hard-won progress in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) .

Climate change is expected to further increase the risks. We are already seeing “irreversible” damage from climate change. According to the IPCC report, more than 3 billion people – almost half of the world’s population – live in “settings that are highly vulnerable to climate change”. And the direct costs of climate change to the health system – not counting health-determining sectors such as agriculture, water and sanitation – are estimated at between $2 billion and $4 billion per year by the WHO. .

Rethinking climate and health

Adapting to climate change will be one of the main highlights of this year’s climate talks in Egypt. World leaders have the opportunity to connect the dots between health, food security, livelihoods, sustainable economic development and climate action as we come together to accelerate the ambition of Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement and sprinting to achieve the lofty goals set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Most nationally determined contributions have identified health as a priority concern. At COP-26, more than 50 countries pledged to build climate-resilient, low-carbon health systems. These include 47 countries, accounting for more than a third of global healthcare emissions. Fourteen countries have also set a target date to achieve net zero carbon emissions in their healthcare system before 2050.

There are a number of entry points that can help countries achieve these goals. Key opportunities arise from adaptation interventions that contribute to food and water security, climate-informed health planning that can feed into national adaptation plans, early warning systems for climate-sensitive infectious diseases capacity building of health facilities to develop protocols and prepare for changing health needs resulting from the climate crisis, public health education campaigns and community-level investments in facilities water and sanitation and other infrastructure that prevents the spread of disease.

When you think about it as a whole, the climate and health crisis is surprisingly complex. In places like Egypt, people need air conditioning units just to survive over 120 degree days. But more alternating current means more greenhouse gases. We must therefore also rethink economic development, incentives for renewable energies, the reduction of hydro-chloro-fluorocarbons and other pollutants that literally poison our planet.

We must also rethink climate resilience in our cities, on the farm and in the marketplace, redefining our approach to trade and economic development as we adapt to the new challenges of the 21st century.

Management of climate-health actions

The good news is that we are making progress.

With funding from the Global Environment Facility’s Special Climate Change Fund, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and WHO have helped local governments lead climate change adaptation efforts to protect human health in Barbados, Bhutan, China, Fiji, Jordan, Kenya and Uzbekistan.

In Barbados, community public health campaigns have promoted the safe use of wastewater. In Bhutan, the government has improved its ability to predict climate-sensitive infectious diseases. And in China, three pilot cities have set up a heat-health alert system.

With GEF funding, UNDP is partnering with WHO to build resilient health systems in Asia’s least developed countries, including Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Nepal, Timor-Leste and Small Island Developing States such as Kiribati, Solomon. Islands, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. Among the various outcomes, the programs will advance climate-informed health planning and early warning systems, build the capacity of health facilities, implement public health campaigns, and support localized community actions directed at the crisis. climate and health.

There’s a bigger picture here. Ultimately, projects designed to achieve food and water security, advance ecosystem-based adaptation or improve livelihoods will help us solve these interconnected problems. In partnership with governments, donors, the private sector, civil society and other key stakeholders, UNDP’s current climate change adaptation portfolio is designed to benefit 126 million people through 1, $6 billion in investments from vertical funds and bilateral donors, as well as an additional $3.8 billion in funding mobilized from partners.

This good start, but far from the 20 to 40 billion US dollars of annual expenditure for adaptation to climate change called for at the Glasgow climate talks.

Taking a system-wide approach, embracing new technologies and ways of working, engaging with the private sector and activating locally-led climate action is essential if we are to address to this crisis.

Millions of lives are at stake. It’s time to step up and make climate action – and climate-health action – a global priority. It is our investment in planet Earth, our investment in future generations, our investment in a better world.

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FDA investigating 10th infant who died after consuming Abbott Labs formula https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/fda-investigating-10th-infant-who-died-after-consuming-abbott-labs-formula/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 03:15:39 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/fda-investigating-10th-infant-who-died-after-consuming-abbott-labs-formula/ The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said Wednesday it is investigating a report of another child who died after consuming infant formula made by Abbott Labs. Olivia Godden feeds her infant son Jaiden formula on Friday, May 13, 2022, at their home in San Antonio [AP Photo/Eric Gay] The FDA said the baby died […]]]>

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said Wednesday it is investigating a report of another child who died after consuming infant formula made by Abbott Labs.

Olivia Godden feeds her infant son Jaiden formula on Friday, May 13, 2022, at their home in San Antonio [AP Photo/Eric Gay]

The FDA said the baby died in January and a consumer complaint was filed in February, but the agency didn’t learn of the complaint until June 10. This new death brings to ten the number of infants who have consumed pediatric nutrition products manufactured by Abbott. Labs before they get sick and die.

At the end of a lengthy press release titled “FDA Provides Update on Efforts to Increase Supply and Availability of Safe and Nutritious Infant Formula,” the agency said it had received the complaint two weeks ago and that it had opened an investigation “given that the complaint referred to the fact that the infant had consumed an Abbott product.

The press release also states, “To date, the FDA has reviewed and investigated a total of 129 complaints associated with Abbott Nutrition formula products. Of these, 119 complaints were reported after Abbott voluntarily recalled the product on February 17.

The FDA says that of the nine deaths previously reported, “only two were associated with the investigation of the Abbott Nutrition Sturgis plant” and that no “definitive link” between the infant deaths and the Sturgis facility has been found. been established.

The closing of the Sturgis, Michigan plant in February was a belated response by the FDA and Abbott Labs to a whistleblower complaint about unsanitary conditions at the facility and a number increasing reports of illness and death of infants who consumed the establishment’s products.

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Melrose: Conversion of ex-bank cafe gets green light from council https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/melrose-conversion-of-ex-bank-cafe-gets-green-light-from-council/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:50:17 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/melrose-conversion-of-ex-bank-cafe-gets-green-light-from-council/ A RETROSPECTIVE planning bid for the conversion of former Royal Bank of Scotland premises into a cafe selling alcohol has been approved. Scottish Borders Council has granted planning approval to Alan Thomson, of Priorsdene, Melrose, for an application to change the use of the Cullen and Kilshaw Royal Bank Chambers office in High Street in […]]]>

A RETROSPECTIVE planning bid for the conversion of former Royal Bank of Scotland premises into a cafe selling alcohol has been approved.

Scottish Borders Council has granted planning approval to Alan Thomson, of Priorsdene, Melrose, for an application to change the use of the Cullen and Kilshaw Royal Bank Chambers office in High Street in Melrose to retail use, workshop and a cafe selling alcohol.

There were submissions supporting and opposing the proposal.

One of the opponents, Gillian Todd, said there were already enough food and drink outlets in Melrose, adding: ‘From what I understand the bid is for a cafe which I suspect , would only be open during the day, so not sure why the need for alcohol.

READ MORE: Call for witnesses after vandals in Kelso scratched number of vehicles

“There are certainly enough places in Melrose to eat and drink and in my opinion the opening of another establishment could be characterized as oversupply. I can also add that although a request for planning has been submitted, the establishment is now open and currently operating as a café.

Supporter Annette Fleming said: ‘I have lived near the property for 16 years, the offices have been empty for several years now. The back of the property was overgrown with litter strewn all around which had a detrimental effect on this part of town. The change will improve this part of Melrose’s High Street. It will benefit both residents and visitors.

“While Melrose is well served for restaurants, there are so many visitors there is plenty of room for an extra cafe.”

In her report, Julie Hayward, council planning officer, said: ‘The building to which this application relates is the former premises of the Royal Bank of Scotland on the corner of High Street and St Dunstan’s Lane in Melrose.

“The proposal will bring a long-vacant building back to the city center and provide a facility for residents and visitors to the city, which will benefit the local economy. The number of similar establishments is not a planning problem.

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Mexican BBQ served in a KY Cathedral https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/mexican-bbq-served-in-a-ky-cathedral/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 23:10:19 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/mexican-bbq-served-in-a-ky-cathedral/ I want to start by going back to my first visit to TGI Fridays. This was in Lexington and this was 1984. I was in high school at a speech tournament, and I don’t think any of us can eat to look around at all the cool stuff on the walls. RESTAURANTS WITH ATMOSPHERE I […]]]>

I want to start by going back to my first visit to TGI Fridays. This was in Lexington and this was 1984. I was in high school at a speech tournament, and I don’t think any of us can eat to look around at all the cool stuff on the walls.

RESTAURANTS WITH ATMOSPHERE

I had never seen decor like this in a restaurant and it simply fascinated me. A few years later, I ate at Darryl’s in Evansville. Talk about atmosphere. I seem to remember eating at a table that was in an old Ferris wheel car if I’m not mistaken. Again, I risked eating cold food because I kept looking around.

As much as I like a good atmosphere in a restaurant, the food has to ALWAYS be good for me to recommend it. Luckily, I’ve had far more restaurant successes than bad ones, and that’s especially true in the Highlands, up and down Bardstown Road in Louisville.

This is my favorite area of ​​Derby City, but I would need to think a bit before naming my favorite restaurant.

A RESTAURANT IN A CATHEDRAL — NOW IT IS ATMOSPHERE

The one I always see but have never visited is Noche Mexican BBQ. If you’re on Bardstown Road, you can’t miss it. It is in a big and beautiful old cathedral.

Don’t ask me why I never went there. I love Mexican food and I love good barbecue, and this combination seems like an opportunity not to be missed.

Oh god, I just saw smoked wings with spicy mole as a sauce option. Now I’m super hungry. (By the way, never say “mole sauce”; “mole” MEANS sauce.)

MEXICAN BARBECUE NOCHE — FOOD, ATMOSPHERE, HOSPITALITY

I will say this. I checked out the amazing menu, and the further down you go, the more expensive it gets. But around the “tacos” or “premium tacos” sections, everything seems reasonable. And I’m sure the portions are huge; restaurants do it now. But it seems that everything is good at Noche – the food, the atmosphere and the hospitality.

THE CONVERSION OF CHURCHES INTO RESTAURANTS IS NOT UNKNOWN

As unusual as it is to convert a church into a restaurant, it’s not the rarest thing in the world, I’ve found.

I know it’s weird to review a restaurant before you’ve even been there. But I put it on my radar and maybe you will too.

I mean, it’s a Mexican barbecue in a CATHEDRAL. How cool is that?

Kentucky restaurants and bars featured on national television

Kentucky has been well-represented in a number of television series, and not just Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives. Check out the list:

Restaurants in the tri-state with stunning views

Whether you’re looking for good family-style comfort food or more of an upscale seafood dish, the Tri-state offers some of the best views that can’t be beat.

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Reviews | Restaurant menus with QR codes are the death of civilization https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/reviews-restaurant-menus-with-qr-codes-are-the-death-of-civilization/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 16:52:47 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/reviews-restaurant-menus-with-qr-codes-are-the-death-of-civilization/ Placeholder while loading article actions The coronavirus pandemic has brought about a number of changes in our way of life, big and small. Some were welcome: flexibility on remote work, for example, or cocktails to go. But here’s an adaptation that can’t be abandoned quickly enough: menus now commoditized by QR code offered instead of […]]]>
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The coronavirus pandemic has brought about a number of changes in our way of life, big and small. Some were welcome: flexibility on remote work, for example, or cocktails to go. But here’s an adaptation that can’t be abandoned quickly enough: menus now commoditized by QR code offered instead of the paper version in millions of American restaurants. They are unnecessary, anti-social, discriminatory and unpopular. They completely degrade the experience of dining out.

If you don’t know what a restaurant QR code is, I envy you. It’s the square black-and-white code you find on a sign at the table when you’re seated, asking you to scan it with your phone’s camera for a link to the establishment’s offers. Offered as a bit of hygiene when restaurants reopened after the closings of the start of the pandemic period, online QR code menus are useless, because the coronavirus is (we now know) an almost entirely airborne pathogen. But too many catering establishments continue to use them.

A physical menu sets the scene. It underscores the fact that it’s a special occasion, even if it’s just a quick bite to eat at a local restaurant. The menu means it’s time to take a break from a busy day, that this meal is something separate from the normal course of events. It also pushes us to interact with others. We share the menus. We point to things; we ask the servers questions about the meal and what they particularly like. It’s like opening a program at the theater, for a show that you and your companions are about to experience together.

Pulling out a phone to check out the menu, on the other hand, is hardly conducive to setting the mood, unless you want to dine in the metaverse. Smartphones are endlessly distracting, and it takes discipline to put them away after consulting a menu, a bit of self-control that many can’t always muster. (Guilty.) It’s all too easy to rationalize checking a single email, sending a single tweet, a single glance at Instagram. (Guilty again.) We already spend nearly five hours a day staring at our smartphone screens. Do we really need a prompt to spend even more time in our electronic silos?

In fact, the QR code, like many, uh, technological advancements of the past decade, is designed to reduce or eliminate contact with others. Some actually think it makes dining out more enjoyable – or at least less work. As one business-to-business site promoting the use of QR codes puts it, “the customer no longer needs to share menus or interact with waiters or waitresses,” adding, “it massively increases the convenience, making dining a more enjoyable experience for everyone.”

Robert Gebelhof


counterpointQR code menus are good. No seriously.

Uh no. A recent Tweeter asking “what do we as a culture need to do to kill QR code menus” received over 300,000 likes. And a poll conducted late last year by the National Restaurant Association found that two-thirds of all adults preferred print menus to the online version. Baby boomers in particular decry the use of QR code menus, with 4 in 5 preferring a physical menu. That may be because, according to the American Civil Liberties Union, 40% of people over 65 still don’t have a smartphone. The same is true for a quarter of those earning less than $30,000 a year. A QR code menu is like telling the elderly and the poor that their business is unwanted. Pleasant!

Robert Gebelhoff: QR code menus are good. No seriously.

Yes, QR code menus have their advocates. I actually know a few of those blinded souls. Some of them are even my colleagues. They say QR code menus are healthier and better for the environment. But let’s be realistic. Germ? If you’re so concerned, ask restaurant management about paid sick leave policies for staff, which is bound to be much more effective in reducing contagion. And no one who writes for a print newspaper has to complain about wasting paper when printing a menu.

So why do QR code menus persist? They provide short-term trading benefits. By placing the menu online, restaurateurs can not only skip the step of bringing you a menu, but they can also adjust their offerings on the fly. This could be especially useful in this time of scarcity and inflation, allowing managers to quickly factor in supply chain issues and raise prices to cover rising costs.

But this flexibility comes with major drawbacks for the restaurant customer. Another: Some industry consultants say QR code menus will ultimately lead to greater profits in the form of an Uber-like price spike, allowing restaurants to charge more on a busy Friday than a busy Friday. rainy Tuesday evening. “Eventually what you will be looking at is a changing menu, and possibly, prices changing throughout the day,” one restaurant industry veteran helpfully explained to Eater last year.

Is this the future you want? Staring at your phone, ignoring your mates, while your pasta explodes at 200% of its normal price? I do not think so. It’s time to end the reign of the QR code menu. It’s a technological breakthrough we could all do without.

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Colombian Coffee from Mendoza Brick NJ https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/colombian-coffee-from-mendoza-brick-nj/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:56:25 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/colombian-coffee-from-mendoza-brick-nj/ You will never hear me complain about having too many pizza places, ever. I’m proud to live in a part of the country where every mall has a pizzeria and a nail salon, maybe even a Chinese restaurant. Sometimes, however, it’s healthy to broaden your horizons and try new types of cuisine. I can’t believe […]]]>

You will never hear me complain about having too many pizza places, ever.

I’m proud to live in a part of the country where every mall has a pizzeria and a nail salon, maybe even a Chinese restaurant.

Sometimes, however, it’s healthy to broaden your horizons and try new types of cuisine.

I can’t believe I just wrote that sentence. It comes from the person who could eat grilled chicken every day for their entire life. Exciting, right?

Do you know Colombian cuisine?

Colombian food is all about flavor.

It’s bandeja paisa. It is a popular midday meal for Colombians and it is made with rice, plantain, arepa, which is a corn cake, avocado, minced meat, chorizo, sausage black and fried pork rind, and there’s a fried egg to top it all off.

Bandeja paisa is the official dish of Colombia.

Picture by WOM | Creative Studio Verona

Picture by WOM | Creative Studio Verona

Many think that empanadas are a Spanish dish, but no. Its roots are in Colombia.

Empanadas are stuffed pastries that are traditionally filled with meat, chicken, or cheese.

Empanadas are popular all over Latin America, but you know you’re eating a Colombian empanada when it’s fried.

It is the Colombian signature.

I’m thrilled to report that we can now enjoy authentic Colombian cuisine right here in Ocean County.

Facebook through Mendoza

Facebook through Mendoza

Mendoza’s Columbian Cafe is now open at 2770 Hooper Avenue in The Brick right next to Lidl.

In addition to delicious food, there is also legit Colombian coffee!

Good luck to the Mendoza’s team and welcome to Brick!

Find out how school cafeteria meals have changed over the past 100 years

Using government reports and news, Stacker traced the history of cafeteria meals from their inception to the present day, with data from news and government reports. Read on to see how various legal acts, food trends and budget cuts have changed what kids get on their trays.
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South American invaders try to gain a foothold in the Everglades https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/south-american-invaders-try-to-gain-a-foothold-in-the-everglades/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 08:11:16 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/south-american-invaders-try-to-gain-a-foothold-in-the-everglades/ EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK __ Chicken eggs are pretty good, but alligator and crocodile eggs, sea turtle eggs and even bird eggs are also on the menu for the black and white Argentine tegus, a lizard that arrived in Florida by the pet store. trade and threatens, along with other plant and animal species, to disrupt […]]]>

EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK __ Chicken eggs are pretty good, but alligator and crocodile eggs, sea turtle eggs and even bird eggs are also on the menu for the black and white Argentine tegus, a lizard that arrived in Florida by the pet store. trade and threatens, along with other plant and animal species, to disrupt the ecosystems of Everglades National Park.

Although probably not as destructive as Burmese pythons, another creepy invader in the park, tegus (Tay’goo) can reach 4 or 5 feet in length, rob ground nests of their eggs, and quickly generate a population boom that challenges efforts to drive them from the Everglades.

“They can weigh up to 10 pounds,” said Kevin Donmoyer, an invasive species biologist at the national park. “The size of a small dog. Tegus in captivity, there’s a lot of material on the internet with large tegus walking around people’s homes, hanging out with the dogs.”

For the past year, the National Parks Traveler writers and editors have chronicled problems across the national park system with invasive species of animals, plants, fish, and even insects. Our final stop was in April at Everglades National Park, arguably the park system’s poster boy for invaders. As we have noted, while much work and billions of dollars have been spent to restore the natural flow of the “grass river” from Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay, a rejuvenation that stands to reap huge benefits to the park’s flora and fauna, on -the ground battles continue against invasive predators that have robbed the park of its small mammals and non-native vegetation that has overwhelmed parts of the fascinating sawdust prairie .

About eight hundred tegus have been captured since park staff began capture operations/Kim O'Connell

About eight hundred tegus have been captured since park staff began capture operations/Kim O’Connell

Pythons, which can reach over 17 feet and 160 pounds and are blamed for a staggering reduction – up to 99% in some cases — populations of small mammals native to the park, were first documented there in the fall of 1979. Today, thousands of large snakes are believed to be found in the park despite continuous efforts to catch them.

One battle the park hopes to have the upper hand involves Tegus. These stocky, low-lying black and white tegus (Salvator merianae), which also come in red (Salvator rufescens) and gold (Tupinambis teguixine) varieties, are newcomers to the growing list of invasive species that threaten to invade park ecosystems.

Tegus, a black and white lizard that is not venomous, is native to Brazil, Paraguay, eastern Uruguay and northern Argentina, but they soon found Florida’s climate to be their taste. They tolerate both fresh and salt water, maneuver easily through both tangles of vegetation and sawgrass prairie, and are adept at taking over the burrows of other animals. Plus, there’s plenty to eat.

A recent study by the US Geological Survey noted that the tegus can adapt to cooler temperatures than species tolerated in its native Argentina.

“Several lines of evidence from recent USGS research studies published from 2018 to 2021 now provide a clear indication to managers that the entire southeastern portion of the United States is at risk of becoming established if lizard releases continue. continue unabated,” said Amy Yackel Adams, a USGS. research ecologist earlier this year.

Lizards were first considered a threat to egg-laying species in Florida in 2013, 11 years after they appeared in pet stores across the state. Four years later they were documented in the park, and in 2020 some hatchlings were captured by staff.

“So we know, at least in 2020, that they were breeding [in the park]”Donmoyer said while checking a trap baited with chicken eggs not far from the Daniel Beard center in the park.

While female tegus can lay nearly three dozen eggs a year, it is unknown how many are free-ranging in the park.

“We don’t know what the population is,” he said. “With our current methods, even though we have improved in eliminating them, we are not yet at the point where we can fully achieve something that we would call eradication. The population continues to grow. learn as much as we can as we go, and keep pushing the [capture] numbers, learning more and more about biology.”

The Everglades aren’t the only place in Florida where lizards are causing trouble. Statewide, more than 12,000 tegus have been captured, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which added the lizard to its list of prohibited species in the state.

“Between October and February, they are basically inactive,” Donmoyer explained. “When we get the traps out in February and we [catch] one or two a week.

About 300 traps have been placed in the park and the areas just to the east, and technicians check them regularly during the warm months. In April, the traps caught about 10 tegus per day. As the months warm, the lizards become more active and find themselves in traps more often, the biologist said.

Biologist Kevin Donmoyer checks a tegu trap baited with a chicken egg/Kim O'Connell

Biologist Kevin Donmoyer checks a tegu trap baited with a chicken egg/Kim O’Connell

“The latest models have tegus potentially extending as far north as North Carolina and as far west as Texas, so it’s not necessarily a problem just in Florida,” Donmoyer said. “And there’s a population in Georgia. Tegus are extremely generalists with what they eat, so they’re going to eat fruit, they’re going to eat insects, mammals, other reptiles. Our big concern here is eggs. They’ve been documented eating alligator eggs. . We know they’ll eat turtle eggs, bird eggs.”

Captured lizards are taken to the park’s laboratory, where they are stored in hard plastic bins with lockable lids. From there, they are humanely destroyed and autopsied, the biologist said.

As the battle against tegus continues, there is always the possibility of another reptilian invader appearing.

“We don’t have monitors [lizards] in the park, which we are aware of,” Donmoyer said. “But we have smaller species of lizards. They are mostly, to our knowledge, limited to car parks. So they’re hitchhikers on the cars, they’re in the undercarriage. They jump into another parking lot and jump into one of our parking lots. Stone Agamas of Peter [native to East Africa]northern curly-tailed lizards [native to Bahamas, Cayman Islands, and Cuba]. These are two non-native species that you will find quite often in Florida, especially in South Florida. »

But as climate change makes the southern part of the United States more suitable for Central and South American species, what will be the next invader to threaten the Everglades ecosystem?

Previous episodes of this series:

Traveler’s Special Report: The Invasion of the National Park System

Traveler’s Special Report: Invasive Fish in National Parks

Parks Audio Postcard | Fight the Russian Olive at Glen Canyon NRA

Travelers’ Special Report: Vegetative Invaders in National Parks

Charity dollars help fight invasive species in the national park system

Traveler’s Special Report: The Cost of Invasive Species in the National Parks System

Travelers Special Report: Fighting Invaders with Fire on National Battlegrounds

Travelers Special Report: Measuring Success Against Invasive Species

Parks Traveler Audio Postcards: Hog Wild

Travelers’ Special Report: Invasive Mammals and National Parks

Everglades National Park: Ground Zero in the Battle Against Invasive Species

Fill the Hole in the Everglades National Park Donut

This story was made possible by Cardno, now Stantec, a global environmental and engineering consultancy.

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A panel discusses WHO’s food safety strategy https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/a-panel-discusses-whos-food-safety-strategy/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 04:28:19 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/a-panel-discusses-whos-food-safety-strategy/ Officials from Europe and Africa shared their thoughts on a recently adopted international food safety plan that set targets to reduce foodborne illness. At a health conference on 8 June, Sandra Gallina, Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety at the European Commission, and Amare Ayalew, from the African Union Commission, spoke about the Global Strategy […]]]>

Officials from Europe and Africa shared their thoughts on a recently adopted international food safety plan that set targets to reduce foodborne illness.

At a health conference on 8 June, Sandra Gallina, Directorate-General for Health and Food Safety at the European Commission, and Amare Ayalew, from the African Union Commission, spoke about the Global Strategy for World Health Organization Food Safety.

World Food Security Day 2022 came 10 days after the adoption of the updated strategy for 2022-2030.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the WHO, said food should be a source of sustenance and pleasure, but far too often it becomes a source of illness and death.

“It’s also a common cause of absenteeism from school and work that prevents people from reaching their full potential. Food security has not received the political attention it deserves. WHO and our partners are working to address this issue through policy advocacy and technical support to countries to strengthen their national food safety systems,” he said.

“At this year’s World Health Assembly, countries endorsed the updated WHO Global Food Safety Strategy, committing for the first time to concrete targets to reduce foodborne diarrhea, strengthen surveillance and improve coordination. Countries also committed to implement the strategy into existing food safety policies and programs and to fund them.

EU emphasizes safety and sustainability
Francesco Branca, director of the department of nutrition and food safety at WHO, said: “The last strategy was published about 20 years ago, so you can imagine the magnitude of the changes that have taken place in food systems. since then. This led us to revise the document, which contains five priorities. Going forward, the work of the Technical Advisory Group will enter a new phase focused on mobilizing advocacy resources, beginning the implementation of actions that will strengthen food security systems and have an impact on the reduction of diseases. food origin.

Gallina said the food we eat is as important as the air we breathe.

“We are talking about something that is of monumental importance to economies. In Europe, we are going through the digital and green transition. We try to move not only towards safe food, but also towards sustainable food systems. We need to have a strong One Health approach, we need global level action, of course regional, national and local level efforts, but we will only be successful if we go global,” she said.

The WHO strategy has learned some lessons from the past, Gallina said.

“There is no doubt that our food systems will evolve over the next decade, so we need to promote innovative approaches and make the best use of the tools we have. Codex’s input is crucial, but it requires continued support from WHO and FAO to ensure that these standards are based on sound science, it’s kind of appealing.

“According to the EU experience, Member States have the capacity to ensure a high level of food safety, which is fundamental for our internal market and the free movement of products in Europe. I wish we had the same in the world. The strategy recognizes the importance of food safety domestically and for international trade. I am happy to see the establishment of food security indicators. It’s a first step, towards international indicators, you have to start somewhere and it’s a huge void that needs to be filled very quickly. This is how we will measure the effectiveness of our various policies. These indicators will still need to be developed.

Good timing and approach to Africa
Ayalew said the strategy came out at a time when food security is at the center of political dialogues and unprecedented political buy-in.

“In Africa, there is a will not to get overwhelmed by the grim statistics of unsafe food, but to focus on implementing solutions. The strategy provides a mechanism to ensure that this momentum of food security prioritization does not become a passing cloud, but is harnessed to effectively address food security challenges. The focus on emerging challenges is a very welcome development,” he said.

If the strategy document is not implemented, it will be just another PDF on computers, Ayalew warned.

“This should be at the regional and national level through the development of strategies and action plans to capture local situations under the global umbrella. The African Union Commission has launched a strategy on food security [2022-2036]. This is aligned with the WHO strategy and focuses on African priorities, we want to emphasize domestic and traditional markets which supply the majority of food on the continent. No one entity can effectively raise the bar to implement the strategy and ensure food security, so collaboration is important. I express my hope that the renewed focus on evidence-based approaches will result in better generation, use and exchange of food safety data.

Don’t take food safety for granted
Speaking in another webinar on the occasion of World Food Safety Day (WFSD), Tom Heilandt, Secretary of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, said: “Last week some colleagues in Rome got sick while eating at the same cafe and they expressed how upset they were about it, it was a place they had trusted before.Then a colleague said it happens sometimes, food poisoning when working in the field is not that uncommon. So for some, food poisoning is a part of life due to their location, it’s sad. Food poisoning should be rare, everywhere .

“We have achieved so much, but we need to do more. We need the WFSD to remind us of this, because in many lucky places safe food is so common that we take it for granted, but maintaining food safety takes constant vigilance and hard work. Yet in other places food poisoning is so common it’s taken for granted, but we need the day to remind ourselves that it’s not normal and there’s a lot we can and should do about it. ‘to prevent. It’s good business to ensure food safety.

An event also took place on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube with WHO scientist Simone Moraes Raszl and FAO Food Safety Officer Jeffrey LeJeune to discuss food safety facts and demystify the popular myths, especially whether to eat food that has fallen on the floor, in June. 6.

LeJeune said: “Every day is a food safety day, we have to make sure food is safe every day. We want to make sure the food does not cause any disease. This has implications for health and trade. Everyone involved in the various stages is responsible for ensuring food safety.

(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)

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How a literary travelogue from the 1970s can transform us all ‹ Literary Hub https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/how-a-literary-travelogue-from-the-1970s-can-transform-us-all-literary-hub/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 09:00:52 +0000 https://fuzerestaurantandlounge.com/how-a-literary-travelogue-from-the-1970s-can-transform-us-all-literary-hub/ An African in Greenlandthe literary travel diary of the 1970s by Tété-Michel Kpomassie, was reissued by Penguin Modern Classics in February in English with a brand new title, Michael the Giant: An African in Greenland. Although the new title refers to how the Inuit locals first saw the hulking black man (the first to venture […]]]>

An African in Greenlandthe literary travel diary of the 1970s by Tété-Michel Kpomassie, was reissued by Penguin Modern Classics in February in English with a brand new title, Michael the Giant: An African in Greenland. Although the new title refers to how the Inuit locals first saw the hulking black man (the first to venture into Greenland), it is also an apt description of the man. in general. Tété-Michel’s extraordinary vision and destiny seem larger than life.

In a recent Guardian interview, he shared that after four decades in France, at age 81, he planned to return to his “spiritual home”, to live his last years in communion with the spirits in the icebergs of Greenland. He leaves behind his whole family to follow his “destiny”. Tété-Michel’s strange and excessive journey is unlike any other, and certainly not mine. But this giant’s remarkable book has transformed me, both as a black man and as a writer – and I believe it can transform us all.

All of us in the Western world exist under the cloud of whiteness, whether we are aware of it or not. The default unconscious preference for Eurocentric values ​​and characteristics is pervasive; insidious. This is a particularly dangerous fault for a Black. The internalization of such a vision of the world is minimized, even dehumanized. The French Caribbean psychiatrist Frantz Fanon called this condition “the internalization of the oppressor”. It’s a tricky business to deal with. And yet, with his apparently apolitical memoirs of travels (and, in fact, with his very life), Tété-Michel offers a challenge to this condition, a kind of creed: one must become a giant to rise above the clouds, out of the shadows. , and realize his true destiny.

The way I found out An African in Greenland seems strange, if not predestined. I had just finished the first draft of my novel, Greenland, in which appears a historical figure, Mohammed El Adl, the first lover of the English novelist EM Forster. El Adl was a black Egyptian streetcar driver whom Forster had met in Alexandria during World War I. As I began to imagine Muhammad’s state of mind, I was visited by one of those rare ideas that seemed to spring from the ether: What if Muhammad was obsessed with fleeing Africa to live in the Arctic with the Inuit? What if he dreamed of building his own igloo and if, in doing so, he really felt capable of surviving? After giving my draft to a friend, he called me on the phone to ask if I had based my idea of ​​Greenland on the man from Togo. I had no idea what he meant.

And that’s when he told me about An African in Greenland. I was floored. How could I dream up such a wacky idea, only to find that someone had actually achieved this amazing aspiration? As soon as I could, I found a copy of Tété-Michel’s book and was captivated by his extraordinary story. I couldn’t believe my luck either. At the right time, this singular book had fallen into my lap. It was exactly what I needed to help me complete mine Greenland. It must have been fate.

The lived story of Tété-Michel also reads like something fateful and fantastic. Raised in a traditional Togolese village, at the age of 16 he was saved from snake poison by a snake cult shaman. To show his gratitude, Tété-Michel’s father offered his son to live permanently with the shaman cult in the jungle. But Tété-Michel, frightened by snakes, decides to run away from home and fulfill his childhood dream, which became an obsession throughout his youth, of going to Greenland to live with the Inuits.

As a child, Tété-Michel found a book at the municipal library, The Eskimos from Greenland to Alaska, by Robert Gessain. He learned that in Greenland it was customary for parents never to force children into anything. Over the years, young Tété-Michel’s obsession never wavered and fueled an incredible journey that took him from Africa to Europe and ultimately to his destiny, Greenland.

Over the years, young Tété-Michel’s obsession never wavered and fueled an incredible journey that took him from Africa to Europe and ultimately to his destiny, Greenland.

An African in Greenland also reads like the work of an accomplished novelist. One is transported through the different worlds of Tété-Michel with such skill that one has the impression of being there with him – in the jungle lair of the serpent shaman; pitching back and forth on the ship’s icy, turbulent passage from Denmark to Greenland; eating raw whale blubber with impoverished Inuit families; sleeping with Greenlandic women while their husbands or fathers nonchalantly tolerate the couplings; or trekking in the northernmost parts of the world with husky sleds; and even, on rare occasions, following suggestions to eat raw huskie meat. It’s all told in painstakingly observed detail, and executed with such a level of specificity, it reminds me of the ultra-realism of Tolstoy, another giant among men.

Tété-Michel’s experiences, from Togo to Greenland, are all seen through the lens of an African raised exclusively in a traditional Togolese village, not a Westernized town. This unique perspective is what makes his work unparalleled. Most travelogues of his time reek of condescending Eurocentrism. An African in Greenland seems of today – a time when the literary establishment is beginning to embrace perspectives that reverse the white gaze.

However, Tété-Michel does much more than reverse the gaze. He views Greenland and its people outside the paradigm of whiteness. The way it assimilates to local customs and their animist worship of sea gods and ancestors, brings no condescending exoticism. He speaks to us of the Greenlandic spiritual “magical reality” as factual.

Having the remarkable quality of allowing us to enter this rare space where Whiteness is not centered, Tété-Michel frees us to look at the world again; and to be free from the parameters in which we normally define ourselves. It reminds me of how Toni Morrison spoke of her own desire to write about the black experience without any reference to whiteness, and how she had to look to African writers, such as Chinua Achebe, for such a role model.

The whiteness is not centered, Tété-Michel frees us to look at the world again; and to be free from the parameters in which we normally define ourselves.

When I first read Tété-Michel’s account, there was a moment when I realized that no European observer was looking over his shoulder or asking for an explanation – only Tété-Michel spoke to me as if I too accepted the Greenlandic reality freely. white gaze. And then, somehow, I found myself remembering the time I burst into tears during a performance of a play in a theater in Brooklyn:

In Pulitzer Prize-winning Jackie Sibblies Drury Fairview, there’s a surprising finale in which all white audience members are invited to take the stage, as the black cast, as well as non-white audience members, watch from the house. As we watched the white people fidget nervously and squint under the blinding stage lights, we realized they couldn’t see us. A young black actress comments on the lights: “They are brilliant, aren’t they? / Should I tell them [the white people] the lights are there to help people see them, / not to help them see anything? She goes on to ask how we non-whites could tell our own stories outside of the white gaze.

She starts the old familiar tales: Either we try to prove we’re just as good; or fight to be recognized as human; or fight to get away from whiteness. But she stops short of getting a full sentence out of each story. “No,” she said. “It’s hard to find the one I wanted to tell.” I burst into tears unexpectedly. One of my deep and hidden questions had finally been articulated, brought to the surface: What would my story be without Whiteness?

Tété-Michel – naturally, casually – provides an answer. He recounts being in a village in northern Greenland when he was called a “nigger” for the first time in his life. It was by an Inuit man who was jealous of Tété-Michel’s luck with local women. Tete-Michel was not disconcerted. He comments, about the aggressor: he was only “an embittered neurotic trying to vent frustrations that have nothing to do with the ‘nigger'”. word. He has never internalized the oppressor, so he is not reactive; he can perceive reality with clarity. He sees the truth of the man who called him “nigger”. Outside the paradigm of Whiteness, Michael the Giant is immune to being hurt by this word.

It’s a godsend to read a book by a man who travels the world without these wounds. This allows us to access more of the world of possibilities in his vision. It even emboldens me, as a black queer author, to strive (in my writing and my life) to be clear about the world around me, not just react to it. The fate of Tété-Michel is perhaps the true fate of all Black people – and, I dare say, of all artists, even of all of us in the Western world who invariably suffer under the dark cloud of Whiteness. We must all strive to become giants.

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David Santos Donaldson Greenland is available now from Amistad.

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